19 Songs, 56 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Based on a Philip K. Dick short story, The Adjustment Bureau portrays a romantic couple — a politician and a ballerina — struggling against the forces of fate as embodied by The Bureau, a mysterious outfit that plans and influences people’s life paths. Veteran composer Thomas Newman crafts an array of cues for the film. “Elise” features a vaguely Middle Eastern melody and tribal beats before morphing into a section with mournful strings and atmospheric electric guitars. “New Leaf” glistens with expectancy as rattling percussion, quiet piano, touches of strings, and reverb guitar combine to create a rich timbral pallet. The cut flows smoothly into “Pier 17,” where similar elements are employed and the tension is ratcheted up a notch. “The Girl On the Bus” finds guitar riding an almost Krautrock-like pulse, while “The Ripples Must Be Endless” effectively wraps things up. “Future’s Bright” and “Are You Ready,” two songs by Richard Ashcroft, bring the big sound of Britpop to the album, and an Adam Freeland remix of Sarah Vaughn’s “Fever” is also included.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Based on a Philip K. Dick short story, The Adjustment Bureau portrays a romantic couple — a politician and a ballerina — struggling against the forces of fate as embodied by The Bureau, a mysterious outfit that plans and influences people’s life paths. Veteran composer Thomas Newman crafts an array of cues for the film. “Elise” features a vaguely Middle Eastern melody and tribal beats before morphing into a section with mournful strings and atmospheric electric guitars. “New Leaf” glistens with expectancy as rattling percussion, quiet piano, touches of strings, and reverb guitar combine to create a rich timbral pallet. The cut flows smoothly into “Pier 17,” where similar elements are employed and the tension is ratcheted up a notch. “The Girl On the Bus” finds guitar riding an almost Krautrock-like pulse, while “The Ripples Must Be Endless” effectively wraps things up. “Future’s Bright” and “Are You Ready,” two songs by Richard Ashcroft, bring the big sound of Britpop to the album, and an Adam Freeland remix of Sarah Vaughn’s “Fever” is also included.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
52 Ratings
52 Ratings
ANewEra ,

Evocative and unique

I agree with Mason, I think Elise is the stand out track here. I also like The Substrate, Real Kiss, Four Elections, The Girl on The Bus, and None of Them are You. I also agree that this is not his best work, but he would have a lot to live up to for this to compare to the likes of Road to Perdition, Shawshank Redemption, and Finding Nemo. Overall, a very good collection of music with interesting textures and percussion, and evocative string lines. Between this and Josh Kramer's Only Memories album, I have all the inspiration I need to start writing my next book.

christianmd ,

Yet Another Great Score

Thomas Newman delivers without fail. While he favors chords and specific instruments that are signature to him, he also reinvents himself. There are moments when you hear Road To Perdition or The Salton Sea for example but mostly you will hear The Adjustment Bureau which is exciting because it's fresh and interesting. The thought of Thomas Newman writing suspense doesn't fit quite right but he pulls it off wonderfully here.

world's#1critic ,

My favorite composor's Back in Business!

Thomas Newman is back after a lengthy break and playing on his offbeat strenghts to deliver what he does best; mystery and romance. He's using all his best moves in tracks like "Real Kiss" while integrating enough new ones to give tracks like "Inflection Points" some fresh bite! I prefer him when he's away from the thriller genre, and the film score on it's own is a better listen than in the context of the film (which was not at all bad, but not great) but there you go; a solid, tricky listen!

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