11 Songs, 54 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though The Age of Fracture gets its title from a book by a Princeton University academic that “addresses the fragmentation of ideas toward the end of the last century and how collective meanings have become uncertain,” don’t fear that Cymbals have lost that fun-lovin’ feeling. Their third album features plenty of the eclectic and unexpected synthetic dance music and playful post-punk friction that’s earned them comparisons with past stylistic leaders like Talking Heads, Human League, and Orange Juice. Working with Hot Chip producer Dreamtrak at his Hackney studio on songs that had been written throughout the year, Cymbals further employed Daniel Rejmer (Foals, Everything Everything) to perform the final mix, ensuring that every second of their brainy postpunk dance music keeps a strong identity. Singer Jack Cleverly switches to French when things get heavy, but whether it’s the atmospheric end-of-the-world theatrics of “Call Me” or the joyous bounce of the hyperactive (yet sparser than it seems) “Empty Space,” Cymbals keep one step ahead of the party.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though The Age of Fracture gets its title from a book by a Princeton University academic that “addresses the fragmentation of ideas toward the end of the last century and how collective meanings have become uncertain,” don’t fear that Cymbals have lost that fun-lovin’ feeling. Their third album features plenty of the eclectic and unexpected synthetic dance music and playful post-punk friction that’s earned them comparisons with past stylistic leaders like Talking Heads, Human League, and Orange Juice. Working with Hot Chip producer Dreamtrak at his Hackney studio on songs that had been written throughout the year, Cymbals further employed Daniel Rejmer (Foals, Everything Everything) to perform the final mix, ensuring that every second of their brainy postpunk dance music keeps a strong identity. Singer Jack Cleverly switches to French when things get heavy, but whether it’s the atmospheric end-of-the-world theatrics of “Call Me” or the joyous bounce of the hyperactive (yet sparser than it seems) “Empty Space,” Cymbals keep one step ahead of the party.

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About Cymbals

London's Cymbals make '80s-influenced, synth-heavy post-punk and dance-rock. Formed in 2010, Cymbals originally featured vocalist/guitarist Jack Cleverly, keyboardist Dan Simons, bassist Luke Carson, and drummer Neil Gillespie. They released their debut album, Unlearn, in 2011, followed by Sideways, Sometimes in 2012. In 2014, Cymbals returned with Age of Fracture, which borrowed its title from Princeton academic Daniel T. Rodgers' book of the same name. Over the course of the following year, the band underwent some turmoil as Cleverly faced his addiction issues and went through a divorce. Subsequently, there were also lineup changes that found Cymbals reduced to a duo with Cleverly and Simons at the helm. In 2017, Cymbals returned with Light in Your Mind, featuring the single "Decay." ~ Matt Collar

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