13 Songs, 54 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Canadian indie pop singer and unlikely commercial firepower Leslie Feist builds on the momentum of 2007’s revelatory The Reminder with another song cycle of great variety and adventurous 21st-century pop-rock. Except this time, the artist known as Feist crafts things on a smaller graph, preferring near lo-fi atmospheres and basement auras. Working again with Chilly Gonzales and Somali-Canadian producer Mocky, Feist strips her music to its essentials. She makes art-pop that’s also strangely accessible, as anyone humming the abstract melodies of “The Circle Married the Line” or “How Come You Never Go There” can attest. There’s a dark mood to much of the material, an angry clang to the Scout Niblett–like guitar and vocal of “Undiscovered First” and a desperation to the nocturnal piano number “Bittersweet Melodies.” Strings don’t sweeten but agitate the cinematic pull of “A Commotion.” It’s as if she decided to make her own Exile on Main Street. But where The Rolling Stones explored classic old American forms, Feist seeks to do the same with all that’s come after.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Canadian indie pop singer and unlikely commercial firepower Leslie Feist builds on the momentum of 2007’s revelatory The Reminder with another song cycle of great variety and adventurous 21st-century pop-rock. Except this time, the artist known as Feist crafts things on a smaller graph, preferring near lo-fi atmospheres and basement auras. Working again with Chilly Gonzales and Somali-Canadian producer Mocky, Feist strips her music to its essentials. She makes art-pop that’s also strangely accessible, as anyone humming the abstract melodies of “The Circle Married the Line” or “How Come You Never Go There” can attest. There’s a dark mood to much of the material, an angry clang to the Scout Niblett–like guitar and vocal of “Undiscovered First” and a desperation to the nocturnal piano number “Bittersweet Melodies.” Strings don’t sweeten but agitate the cinematic pull of “A Commotion.” It’s as if she decided to make her own Exile on Main Street. But where The Rolling Stones explored classic old American forms, Feist seeks to do the same with all that’s come after.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
849 Ratings
849 Ratings
Channel Se7en ,

Marvelous

Feist just gets better and better with each and every album she releases. This is one release in music where I was literally counting the years between it and the last. Her voice is absolutely superb (as always) and beautifully sweet to the ear... and the vocal control she has is simply astounding. I fell in love with this album from the moment I heard it, and initially, it was very difficult to place into words such emotions and feelings for the review. It is more of a slow-tempo body of work compared to her previous releases... and is also much more organic in instrumentation and production. My favorite record is "Caught A Long Wind" which is simply mind blowing - the arrangement both musically and vocally is one of the best productions that I have ever heard. Other favorites include "Bittersweet Melodies" (which ironically has the most incredible melody) and "The Bad In Each Other" (one of the few mid-tempo songs on the album). I am very (very) pleased with this LP. It took 4 long years of waiting... but the interval, without a doubt, was well worth it. Feist took her time and delivered a work of art that exceeded all expectations... and she should be very proud of what she has given to the world. 5 stars easily.

Luke.Cage ,

If you happen to have a ladyfriend over

Feist.

Bjork.

Thank me tomorrow morning.

spencerorange ,

Feist Returns

Feist returns with an amazing new album. Its raw. Its simple. Its the perfect album to curl up with a cup of coffee and look at the leaves falling. Feist is definitley an artist. She paints such vivid pictures in our minds through her music. A+

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