11 Songs, 32 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

After a few notes of the ragtime-tinged title track, it’s obvious that Georgie Fame’s decision to record a song about Bonnie and Clyde came about after seeing the 1967 film about the doomed gangsters. The rest of The Ballad of Bonnie & Clyde (a repackaging of 1968’s Third Face of Fame) was sequenced to highlight similar-sounding selections wherein Fame blends old-fashioned American R&B into his instantly accessible mod-jazz style. A cover of The Beatles’ “When I’m Sixty-Four” follows, with antiquated-sounding woodwinds and other Dixieland instrumentation as Fame croons in his buttery tenor. A bouncy cover of Jimmy McHugh and Dorothy Fields’ 1930 hit “Exactly Like You” makes good use of big-band accompaniment, while a saucy cover of Norman Greenbaum’s “Bullets La Verne” plays like a burlesque soundtrack at a swanky speakeasy. Even Donovan’s “Mellow Yellow” gets reworked to sound like the kind of tune Edward G. Robinson would enjoy.

EDITORS’ NOTES

After a few notes of the ragtime-tinged title track, it’s obvious that Georgie Fame’s decision to record a song about Bonnie and Clyde came about after seeing the 1967 film about the doomed gangsters. The rest of The Ballad of Bonnie & Clyde (a repackaging of 1968’s Third Face of Fame) was sequenced to highlight similar-sounding selections wherein Fame blends old-fashioned American R&B into his instantly accessible mod-jazz style. A cover of The Beatles’ “When I’m Sixty-Four” follows, with antiquated-sounding woodwinds and other Dixieland instrumentation as Fame croons in his buttery tenor. A bouncy cover of Jimmy McHugh and Dorothy Fields’ 1930 hit “Exactly Like You” makes good use of big-band accompaniment, while a saucy cover of Norman Greenbaum’s “Bullets La Verne” plays like a burlesque soundtrack at a swanky speakeasy. Even Donovan’s “Mellow Yellow” gets reworked to sound like the kind of tune Edward G. Robinson would enjoy.

TITLE TIME

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