8 Songs, 37 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Marianne Faithfull had already been written off as a one-hit wonder ("As Tears Go By") and a dark angel of drug-dependence ("Sister Morphine") when she reinvented herself in 1979 with this tough, entrancing collection of synthesizer-driven dance tracks. Granted, it's death disco, with Faithfull's scarred vocal delivery leading the dance , and years of drinking, drugs and cigarettes removed any trace of her choirgirl innocence. Her version of John Lennon's "Working Class Hero" has a pulsing menace underneath its social class warnings. "Why D'Ya Do It?" is an X-rated recounting of high infidelity, driven by hard rock guitar and Faithfull's agonized scowl. "The Ballad of Lucy Jordan" is a middle-aged woman's admission that life's kicks are no longer within view. Throughout Broken English there are moments of eerie self-acknowledgement. With it, Faithfull found her true voice and used it to its full advantage.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Marianne Faithfull had already been written off as a one-hit wonder ("As Tears Go By") and a dark angel of drug-dependence ("Sister Morphine") when she reinvented herself in 1979 with this tough, entrancing collection of synthesizer-driven dance tracks. Granted, it's death disco, with Faithfull's scarred vocal delivery leading the dance , and years of drinking, drugs and cigarettes removed any trace of her choirgirl innocence. Her version of John Lennon's "Working Class Hero" has a pulsing menace underneath its social class warnings. "Why D'Ya Do It?" is an X-rated recounting of high infidelity, driven by hard rock guitar and Faithfull's agonized scowl. "The Ballad of Lucy Jordan" is a middle-aged woman's admission that life's kicks are no longer within view. Throughout Broken English there are moments of eerie self-acknowledgement. With it, Faithfull found her true voice and used it to its full advantage.

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