12 Songs, 45 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The craziest thing about Lee Ann Womack’s 2008 album may be its title. There’s not a lot of lunacy to be found on Call Me Crazy, but fans of good country music won’t miss the madness. Since her debut, Womack has avoided excess in favor of a restrained yet soulful brand of country traditionalism. Call Me Crazy is no different, though a few quirky arrangements add some fresh colors to her sound. The mood is mostly melancholy, lightened by flashes of hard-won optimism. “Last Call” is the album’s obvious radio hit, a mixture of sentimentality and realism that fits Womack’s vocal style perfectly. The bruised side of love is probed further on “Either Way” and “If These Walls Could Talk,” while “I Think I Know” offers a toast to country music’s fallen legends. Producer Tony Brown tries some new touches, such as the reverb-heavy groove of “The Bees” (featuring Keith Urban). More expected (and just as welcome) is the string-draped ballad “Everything But Quits” (a duet with George Strait) and the subdued meditation “The Story of My Life” (an echo of Womack’s hit “I Hope You Dance”). Crazy or otherwise, Lee Ann is in consistently fine form here.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The craziest thing about Lee Ann Womack’s 2008 album may be its title. There’s not a lot of lunacy to be found on Call Me Crazy, but fans of good country music won’t miss the madness. Since her debut, Womack has avoided excess in favor of a restrained yet soulful brand of country traditionalism. Call Me Crazy is no different, though a few quirky arrangements add some fresh colors to her sound. The mood is mostly melancholy, lightened by flashes of hard-won optimism. “Last Call” is the album’s obvious radio hit, a mixture of sentimentality and realism that fits Womack’s vocal style perfectly. The bruised side of love is probed further on “Either Way” and “If These Walls Could Talk,” while “I Think I Know” offers a toast to country music’s fallen legends. Producer Tony Brown tries some new touches, such as the reverb-heavy groove of “The Bees” (featuring Keith Urban). More expected (and just as welcome) is the string-draped ballad “Everything But Quits” (a duet with George Strait) and the subdued meditation “The Story of My Life” (an echo of Womack’s hit “I Hope You Dance”). Crazy or otherwise, Lee Ann is in consistently fine form here.

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