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Album Review

Classic Concert Live finds baritone saxophonist Gerry Mulligan, pianist George Shearing, and vocalist Mel Tormé performing together with a big band in 1982 at Carnegie Hall. The trio first performed in 1977, but this marks the only recorded document of the group. Generally the tone is light and swinging as befits the cool jazz background of Mulligan and "Velvet Fog" reputation of Tormé. Similarly, Shearing is in fine form with his urbane keyboard style adding dramatic punch throughout the night. Whether performing one of Mulligan's classic compositions such as "Line for Lyons" or a standard like "What Are You Doing for the Rest of Your Life," the trio sounds terrific.

Customer Reviews

I LUV THIS ALBUM!!

It's total L337 H4X0R! LOL! Rofl mao! But seriously, this album roxors to the maxors! 50/5

A True Classic

I first recorded this concert with my tape deck off of NPR in 1983 and played it over and over. I was so happy when a friend discovered it had been released on CD in 2005 (although it’s missing a few of the songs from that broadcast). I think what I enjoy most is how much fun Mel, Gerry and George are having throughout the show. They are true artists. You won’t be disappointed in this recording.

Biography

Born: September 13, 1925 in Chicago, IL

Genre: Jazz

Years Active: '30s, '40s, '50s, '60s, '70s, '80s, '90s

Mel Tormé was a jazz-oriented pop singer who worked at his craft steadily from the '40s to the '90s, primarily in nightclubs and concert halls. In his 1988 autobiography, It Wasn't All Velvet (its title a reference to his nickname, "The Velvet Fog," bestowed upon him by a disc jockey in the '40s to describe his husky, wide-ranging voice), he mentioned a wish that he had been born ten years earlier, that is, in 1915 rather than 1925. If he had had his wish, Tormé would have been an exact contemporary...
Full Bio