126 Songs, 12 Hours 17 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

There’s really no better way to commemorate Rush’s 2013 induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame than with The Complete Mercury Years. Boasting a voluminous 141 songs, it sequentially compiles the 12 studio albums that the Canadian prog pioneers recorded for Mercury. The pristine remastering here is immediately noticeable from the opening “Finding My Way,” the lead track of the band’s 1974 eponymous debut album. Back when drummer John Rutsey predated prodigy Neil Peart, Rush played hard rock similar to early Led Zeppelin or Black Sabbath. But the album’s originally murky fidelity made it hard to home in on the nuances of the band in its early stage. Now the riffs here and in the hard-grooving “Working Man” can be heard in all their intended glory. Of course this fidelity extends into more notable moments later in Rush’s career. The title track of 1975’s Fly by Night now sounds more stereophonically panoramic, and Geddy Lee’s prowess as a bassist really pops out of the mix. Even the originally stellar production of “Tom Sawyer” sounds acutely enhanced.

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

There’s really no better way to commemorate Rush’s 2013 induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame than with The Complete Mercury Years. Boasting a voluminous 141 songs, it sequentially compiles the 12 studio albums that the Canadian prog pioneers recorded for Mercury. The pristine remastering here is immediately noticeable from the opening “Finding My Way,” the lead track of the band’s 1974 eponymous debut album. Back when drummer John Rutsey predated prodigy Neil Peart, Rush played hard rock similar to early Led Zeppelin or Black Sabbath. But the album’s originally murky fidelity made it hard to home in on the nuances of the band in its early stage. Now the riffs here and in the hard-grooving “Working Man” can be heard in all their intended glory. Of course this fidelity extends into more notable moments later in Rush’s career. The title track of 1975’s Fly by Night now sounds more stereophonically panoramic, and Geddy Lee’s prowess as a bassist really pops out of the mix. Even the originally stellar production of “Tom Sawyer” sounds acutely enhanced.

Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5
88 Ratings
88 Ratings
blue_strat ,

No digital Booklets

Why didn't they include digital booklets for each album? If you're gonna do it, do it right.

Some Guy87 ,

I hear no difference

I'll give it 5 stars because Rush is my favorite band, but seriously people, if you already have the albums, DON'T REBUY THEM. What I already have, I have enjoyed for years and will continue to enjoy. Re-buying is a waste of money. Use that money instead to see them on tour.

kyle butler ,

Taking Advantage

Wow! Talk about a record label capitalizing on Rush's new found coolness. I guess if you want to get into Rush,great way to do so. I just wish that they would have included bonus material on each disc. Then the record company could have gotten even more folks to buy these discs....again.

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