9 Songs, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

After management forced him to credit his first solo album to “Black Sabbath Featuring Tony Iommi,” Iommi bowed to pressure and agreed to officially revive the Sabbath moniker for his second solo effort. The Eternal Idol features Iommi’s core touring band (bassist Bob Daisley, keyboardist Geoff Nicholls, drummer Eric Singer) and augments them with the lead vocals of fellow Brummie Tony Martin, who'd go on to be Sabbath’s longest-serving vocalist after Ozzy Osbourne. The Eternal Idol (named after the 1889 Rodin sculpture replicated on the cover) is far more energetic than its predecessors. While Iommi and company thankfully steer clear of hair-metal fluffiness, songs like “Hard Life to Love,” “Born to Lose," and “Lost Forever” shed any trace of Sabbath’s famously gloomy aura. Thankfully, Iommi’s volcanic guitar comes shining through near-pop songs like “The Shining” and “Glory Ride,” which signaled a new epoch for the hallowed band. Fans in withdrawal from the band’s '70s sound should proceed directly to the title track, a lumbering sludge-metal epic that's one of Sabbath's most underrated songs from any era.

EDITORS’ NOTES

After management forced him to credit his first solo album to “Black Sabbath Featuring Tony Iommi,” Iommi bowed to pressure and agreed to officially revive the Sabbath moniker for his second solo effort. The Eternal Idol features Iommi’s core touring band (bassist Bob Daisley, keyboardist Geoff Nicholls, drummer Eric Singer) and augments them with the lead vocals of fellow Brummie Tony Martin, who'd go on to be Sabbath’s longest-serving vocalist after Ozzy Osbourne. The Eternal Idol (named after the 1889 Rodin sculpture replicated on the cover) is far more energetic than its predecessors. While Iommi and company thankfully steer clear of hair-metal fluffiness, songs like “Hard Life to Love,” “Born to Lose," and “Lost Forever” shed any trace of Sabbath’s famously gloomy aura. Thankfully, Iommi’s volcanic guitar comes shining through near-pop songs like “The Shining” and “Glory Ride,” which signaled a new epoch for the hallowed band. Fans in withdrawal from the band’s '70s sound should proceed directly to the title track, a lumbering sludge-metal epic that's one of Sabbath's most underrated songs from any era.

TITLE TIME

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