15 Songs, 55 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Seven years after his last album, Southern hip-hop icon David Banner returns with a ferocious and timely takedown of the status quo. The God Box takes some of today’s most pressing issues—racism, misogyny, police brutality—and applies pressure. On “Magnolia,” the album’s gritty and growling opener, he recalls the tree’s horrifying connection to slavery, setting a mood so heavy, even Cee-Lo Green can’t lift it. But Banner wants listeners to feel the weight of these issues. “Who Want It” stomps on political corruption, and “Elvis” calls out, by name, white voices who have taken over black music (“Lord don’t take my heart/Lord don’t take my soul/Lord don’t let them take hip-hop like they took rock and roll”).

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics. Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Seven years after his last album, Southern hip-hop icon David Banner returns with a ferocious and timely takedown of the status quo. The God Box takes some of today’s most pressing issues—racism, misogyny, police brutality—and applies pressure. On “Magnolia,” the album’s gritty and growling opener, he recalls the tree’s horrifying connection to slavery, setting a mood so heavy, even Cee-Lo Green can’t lift it. But Banner wants listeners to feel the weight of these issues. “Who Want It” stomps on political corruption, and “Elvis” calls out, by name, white voices who have taken over black music (“Lord don’t take my heart/Lord don’t take my soul/Lord don’t let them take hip-hop like they took rock and roll”).

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics. Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5
433 Ratings
433 Ratings
conspira C

Revolutionary

This album is going to help wake up the sleeping crayons.

garnergirls

#theGodbox

One of the best hip hop albums...just watch and see. Banner absolutely smashed #theGodbox

DCCNM

A much needed message

I'm sure this album is going to be worth the wait. Mr. Banner is addressing some very important topics on this album- particularly racism, religion, and social justice. It is a bold step forward and away from the mindless sex, drugs, and guns lyrics that have saturated the rap market for the past two decades. For all the (probably white) reviewers who are calling him racist, please understand that racism requires both power and oppression. How is Mr. Banner oppressing anyone? If this album mirrored all the rap you're used to listening to, where there's no real message, and plenty of N words and misogyny, you'd be lining up to buy it. If the truth and history make you uncomfortable, go listen to heavy rotation on the radio and save your tears. Mr. Banner has message for his people, and everybody isn't going to like it. Stop inviting yourself places.

About David Banner

One half of the rap duo Crooked Lettaz, David Banner helped put Mississippi on the map in 1999. In 2000, he released his first solo album in Them Firewater Boyz, Vol. 1. Originally on Penalty Records, he realized quickly that a New York-based record label just didn't know how to handle the south. With the help of his crew, he managed to sell over 10,000 copies of his first album in his hometown alone. He broke out nationally in 2003 with a pair of albums, Mississippi: The Album and MTA2: Baptized in Dirty Water. These releases spawned a varied clutch of hits -- "Like a Pimp," "Cadillac on 22's" and "Crank It Up." Two years later, he released Certified. ~ Brad Mills

HOMETOWN
Jackson, MS
BORN
April 11, 1973

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