1994 by Shawn Camp on Apple Music

10 Songs

EDITORS’ NOTES

In 1994, Warner/Reprise decided to shelve Nashville singer/songwriter Shawn Camp’s second album. Sixteen years later, the project has been rescued from the vaults, making available some exceptionally smart and tuneful country music. 1994 confirms the promise Camp showed on his self-titled debut album and makes clear that his later success as tunesmith for other artists was no fluke. Produced by Emery Gordy, Jr., there’s plenty of keening pedal steel and rootsy fiddle here, along with nods to bluegrass and Bakersfield-style honky-tonk. Camp’s clear-toned vocals are applied to songs mixing inconsolable heartache (“My Frame of Mind,” “Since You Ain’t Home”) with a jaunty attitude towards romantic loss (“Near Mrs.,” “Little Bitty Crack In Her Heart”). At times — especially on “Clear as a Bell” and “The Grandpa That I Know” – his work displays the masterful craftsmanship of a Tom T. Hall. “Movin’ On Up to a Double Wide” is a wry working-class vignette, while “Worn Through Stone” (featuring vocals by the legendary Bill Monroe) is classic country balladry.

EDITORS’ NOTES

In 1994, Warner/Reprise decided to shelve Nashville singer/songwriter Shawn Camp’s second album. Sixteen years later, the project has been rescued from the vaults, making available some exceptionally smart and tuneful country music. 1994 confirms the promise Camp showed on his self-titled debut album and makes clear that his later success as tunesmith for other artists was no fluke. Produced by Emery Gordy, Jr., there’s plenty of keening pedal steel and rootsy fiddle here, along with nods to bluegrass and Bakersfield-style honky-tonk. Camp’s clear-toned vocals are applied to songs mixing inconsolable heartache (“My Frame of Mind,” “Since You Ain’t Home”) with a jaunty attitude towards romantic loss (“Near Mrs.,” “Little Bitty Crack In Her Heart”). At times — especially on “Clear as a Bell” and “The Grandpa That I Know” – his work displays the masterful craftsmanship of a Tom T. Hall. “Movin’ On Up to a Double Wide” is a wry working-class vignette, while “Worn Through Stone” (featuring vocals by the legendary Bill Monroe) is classic country balladry.

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About Shawn Camp

Country singer/songwriter Shawn Camp spent his early years on a farm outside of Perryville, AR. His father was an ironworker and his mother a beautician. Both sang and played guitar, infusing their child with a love of music; he began playing guitar himself at five. At the age of 20 in January 1987, he moved to Nashville to become a professional musician. He first found a berth as a fiddle player for the Osborne Brothers, and subsequently moved on to the backing bands for Jerry Reed, Alan Jackson, Suzy Bogguss, Shelby Lynne, and Trisha Yearwood. In 1991, he left Yearwood to become a solo performer. He was signed to the Reprise division of Warner Bros. Records, which released his debut single, "Fallin' Never Felt So Good," in 1993. It entered the country charts that July and peaked in the Top 40 in October. That month, Reprise released Camp's first album, Shawn Camp, which spent several weeks in the country charts. A second single, "Confessin' My Love," peaked in the country Top 40 in January 1994.

Camp recorded a second album for Reprise, but the label rejected it and dropped him. He turned to working as a session musician, appearing on albums by John Prine, Garth Brooks, Nanci Griffith, and Guy Clark, among others, over the rest of the decade. At the same time, he co-wrote songs that were covered by many artists, including Diamond Rio, Tracy Byrd, Kenny Chesney, John Anderson, and Randy Travis. "Two Pina Coladas," which he co-wrote for Garth Brooks, appeared on Brooks' Sevens album and hit number one on the country charts in May 1998, and "How Long Gone," which he co-wrote for Brooks & Dunn, hit number one on the country charts in September 1998. Camp self-released his second album, Lucky Silver Dollar, in July 2001. This set was followed by Live at the Station Inn in 2004, Fireball in 2006, and The Bluegrass Elvises, Vol. 1 with Billy Burnette in 2007. In 2009, Warner Music Nashville President/CEO John Esposito caught Camp at a guitar pull during a music conference and was knocked out. Discovering that Warner had Camp's unreleased second album in its vaults, he had the label release the album in 2010 (now entitled 1994), to coincide with a reissue of his 1993 debut for Reprise. ~ William Ruhlmann

  • ORIGIN
    Perryville, AR
  • BORN
    Aug 29, 1966

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