16 Songs, 1 Hour 5 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

 An album three years in the making and the first new studio material since 1999’s Wonderful, The Liberty of Norton Folgate has received some of the strongest reviews of this British group’s three-decade-long career. It’s an ambitious collection that ends with the ten-minute title track where a historical recounting of the area outside the old city walls of London that once served as a haven for artists is delivered amongst the group’s diverse songcraft, which transcends the 2-Tone/Second Wave ska of the group’s initial inspirations to incorporate hard rock, nightclub jazz, and even some polka. The group’s musical and conceptual ambitions spill over to the actual spirited playing, well captured by their much lauded production team of Clive Langer and Alan Winstanley. “We Are London,” “Sugar and Spice,” and “Forever Young” begin things with pop instincts and an aggressive excitement, while “Dust Devil” and “Rainbows” deliberately lay back and allow the group’s instrumental chops to fill in the grooves. Lots of insidious little melodies hide in the shadows of these experienced players.

EDITORS’ NOTES

 An album three years in the making and the first new studio material since 1999’s Wonderful, The Liberty of Norton Folgate has received some of the strongest reviews of this British group’s three-decade-long career. It’s an ambitious collection that ends with the ten-minute title track where a historical recounting of the area outside the old city walls of London that once served as a haven for artists is delivered amongst the group’s diverse songcraft, which transcends the 2-Tone/Second Wave ska of the group’s initial inspirations to incorporate hard rock, nightclub jazz, and even some polka. The group’s musical and conceptual ambitions spill over to the actual spirited playing, well captured by their much lauded production team of Clive Langer and Alan Winstanley. “We Are London,” “Sugar and Spice,” and “Forever Young” begin things with pop instincts and an aggressive excitement, while “Dust Devil” and “Rainbows” deliberately lay back and allow the group’s instrumental chops to fill in the grooves. Lots of insidious little melodies hide in the shadows of these experienced players.

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