11 Songs, 54 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though The Age of Fracture gets its title from a book by a Princeton University academic that “addresses the fragmentation of ideas toward the end of the last century and how collective meanings have become uncertain,” don’t fear that Cymbals have lost that fun-lovin’ feeling. Their third album features plenty of the eclectic and unexpected synthetic dance music and playful post-punk friction that’s earned them comparisons with past stylistic leaders like Talking Heads, Human League, and Orange Juice. Working with Hot Chip producer Dreamtrak at his Hackney studio on songs that had been written throughout the year, Cymbals further employed Daniel Rejmer (Foals, Everything Everything) to perform the final mix, ensuring that every second of their brainy postpunk dance music keeps a strong identity. Singer Jack Cleverly switches to French when things get heavy, but whether it’s the atmospheric end-of-the-world theatrics of “Call Me” or the joyous bounce of the hyperactive (yet sparser than it seems) “Empty Space,” Cymbals keep one step ahead of the party.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though The Age of Fracture gets its title from a book by a Princeton University academic that “addresses the fragmentation of ideas toward the end of the last century and how collective meanings have become uncertain,” don’t fear that Cymbals have lost that fun-lovin’ feeling. Their third album features plenty of the eclectic and unexpected synthetic dance music and playful post-punk friction that’s earned them comparisons with past stylistic leaders like Talking Heads, Human League, and Orange Juice. Working with Hot Chip producer Dreamtrak at his Hackney studio on songs that had been written throughout the year, Cymbals further employed Daniel Rejmer (Foals, Everything Everything) to perform the final mix, ensuring that every second of their brainy postpunk dance music keeps a strong identity. Singer Jack Cleverly switches to French when things get heavy, but whether it’s the atmospheric end-of-the-world theatrics of “Call Me” or the joyous bounce of the hyperactive (yet sparser than it seems) “Empty Space,” Cymbals keep one step ahead of the party.

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