23 Songs, 1 Hour 30 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though Joan Baez is best known as a landmark folk singer, many of her albums in the late '60s and early '70s were made in Nashville and have a deliberate country flavor. This final studio album with her original label, Vanguard Records, would also feature her first sizable hit single: a cover of The Band's "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down," which landed at No. 11 on the pop charts. Baez wrote a good chunk of originals and filled the remainder of the album with songs from The Rolling Stones ("Salt of the Earth"), Mickey Newbury ("San Francisco Mabel Joy," "The 33rd of August," "Angeline"), The Beatles ("Let It Be"), and Kris Kristofferson ("Help Me Make It Through the Night"). Her backing band includes Norman Blake, Kenny Buttrey, David Briggs, producer Norbert Putnam, and Charlie McCoy among the blessed few. This album was released as a double LP with a bonus single that ran at 33 1/3 and featured "Maria Dolores" and Woody Guthrie's "Deportee." This reissue adds a live version of Percy Sledge's "Warm and Tender Love."

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though Joan Baez is best known as a landmark folk singer, many of her albums in the late '60s and early '70s were made in Nashville and have a deliberate country flavor. This final studio album with her original label, Vanguard Records, would also feature her first sizable hit single: a cover of The Band's "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down," which landed at No. 11 on the pop charts. Baez wrote a good chunk of originals and filled the remainder of the album with songs from The Rolling Stones ("Salt of the Earth"), Mickey Newbury ("San Francisco Mabel Joy," "The 33rd of August," "Angeline"), The Beatles ("Let It Be"), and Kris Kristofferson ("Help Me Make It Through the Night"). Her backing band includes Norman Blake, Kenny Buttrey, David Briggs, producer Norbert Putnam, and Charlie McCoy among the blessed few. This album was released as a double LP with a bonus single that ran at 33 1/3 and featured "Maria Dolores" and Woody Guthrie's "Deportee." This reissue adds a live version of Percy Sledge's "Warm and Tender Love."

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About Joan Baez

Joan Baez’s distinctive voice served as a beacon amid the dramatic social upheaval of the ’60s. Born in New York in 1941, Baez was a rising star in the folk-revival boom—a singer who swiftly earned a reputation as a master interpreter, reinvigorating finger-picking standards like “House of the Rising Sun” with a haunted sense of melancholy and bracing vocal trills that successors like Joni Mitchell would eagerly adopt. She was also instrumental in bringing the songs of a young Bob Dylan to a wider audience, amplifying the graceful melodicism in tunes like “Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right” that often gets overshadowed by his voice’s characteristic grit. Through her vocal advocacy of social justice, Baez became a countercultural icon without ever pandering to rock audiences, resolutely performing her set at Woodstock in a solo acoustic setup. And from the ’70s on, that fearlessness has manifested itself in increasingly eclectic records; Baez moved between country music, Spanish folk, and even sound collage, while also writing bittersweet ballads like 1975’s “Diamonds and Rust.” In the 21st century, her exploratory instincts have led her to cover the songs of modern-day outlaws like Steve Earle and Ryan Adams, reinforcing the spiritual connection among generations of roots radicals.

HOMETOWN
Staten Island, NY
BORN
January 9, 1941

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