94 Songs, 6 Hours 31 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Nothing makes better sense than hearing the first eight essential Bob Dylan albums in mono. Though ’stereo’ emerged as the 1960s evolved, ‘mono’ was how these albums were originally considered and mixed. Dylan’s first four albums consisted of voice, guitar and harmonica and have no need for stereo. It’s readily apparent, though, that a fresh talent has arrived, with originals such as “Girl From the North Country” and “Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right.” The Times They Are A-Changin’, largely socio-political, shows signs (“Boots of Spanish Leather”) of personal writing that would dominate on Another Side of Bob Dylan. Dylan plugged in for parts of 1965’s Bringing It All Back Home, but side two was an all-acoustic suite of perfection. 1965’s other album Highway 61 Revisited and 1966’s double-LP Blonde On Blonde remain among the greatest rock albums of all-time, nearly perfect in their execution and composition (“Like A Rolling Stone,” “Visions of Johanna,” “I Want You”). 1967’s John Wesley Harding is ghostly, small band performances of songs that read as mystical allegories.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Nothing makes better sense than hearing the first eight essential Bob Dylan albums in mono. Though ’stereo’ emerged as the 1960s evolved, ‘mono’ was how these albums were originally considered and mixed. Dylan’s first four albums consisted of voice, guitar and harmonica and have no need for stereo. It’s readily apparent, though, that a fresh talent has arrived, with originals such as “Girl From the North Country” and “Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right.” The Times They Are A-Changin’, largely socio-political, shows signs (“Boots of Spanish Leather”) of personal writing that would dominate on Another Side of Bob Dylan. Dylan plugged in for parts of 1965’s Bringing It All Back Home, but side two was an all-acoustic suite of perfection. 1965’s other album Highway 61 Revisited and 1966’s double-LP Blonde On Blonde remain among the greatest rock albums of all-time, nearly perfect in their execution and composition (“Like A Rolling Stone,” “Visions of Johanna,” “I Want You”). 1967’s John Wesley Harding is ghostly, small band performances of songs that read as mystical allegories.

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