28 Songs, 1 Hour 36 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This is a two-disc live album featuring Mike Doughty and his right-hand cellist/bassist man Andrew “Scrap” Livingston. In between certain songs, the duo answer questions that audience members put in a jar at the front of the stage before the show began. The questions are mostly silly and frivolous, letting the two have a bit of lighthearted fun while simultaneously visiting the emotional core of songs that aren't quite so easygoing. It’s no secret that Doughty has faced many difficulties over the years. His memoir The Book of Drugs is unsparing and hilarious where it needs to be. Most songs here hail from the Haughty Melodic and Golden Delicious period of his solo career, with such better-known tunes as “Looking at the World from the Bottom of a Well,” “Busting Up a Starbucks,” “Madeline and Nine,” “27 Jennifers," and “Pleasure on Credit” all making appearances. The acoustic setting is best for those who enjoy Doughty at his most intimate. Fans of his hard pop arrangements will prefer the studio versions, though there’s no reason not to enjoy both.

EDITORS’ NOTES

This is a two-disc live album featuring Mike Doughty and his right-hand cellist/bassist man Andrew “Scrap” Livingston. In between certain songs, the duo answer questions that audience members put in a jar at the front of the stage before the show began. The questions are mostly silly and frivolous, letting the two have a bit of lighthearted fun while simultaneously visiting the emotional core of songs that aren't quite so easygoing. It’s no secret that Doughty has faced many difficulties over the years. His memoir The Book of Drugs is unsparing and hilarious where it needs to be. Most songs here hail from the Haughty Melodic and Golden Delicious period of his solo career, with such better-known tunes as “Looking at the World from the Bottom of a Well,” “Busting Up a Starbucks,” “Madeline and Nine,” “27 Jennifers," and “Pleasure on Credit” all making appearances. The acoustic setting is best for those who enjoy Doughty at his most intimate. Fans of his hard pop arrangements will prefer the studio versions, though there’s no reason not to enjoy both.

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