10 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

As the album cover says, "The Voice of Bad Company and Free Celebrates Classic Masterpieces of Memphis." Fair enough. The man best known to classic rock fans for “All Right Now,” “Feel Like Makin’ Love," and “Can’t Get Enough” headed down to the legendary Royal Studios in Memphis and cut this album of songs best associated with that city's Stax Records (and a few others originally recorded a little further down in Muscle Shoals, Ala.). Paul Rodgers’ voice is in fine form, and the arrangements remain true to the originals, with plenty of Hammond B-3 organ, acoustic and electric piano, Memphis horns, smooth in-the-pocket drums, and electric bass, all true to the sounds of the '60s and early '70s. Versions of Ann Peebles’ “I Can’t Stand the Rain,” Albert King’s “Born Under a Bad Sign,” and Otis Redding’s “I’ve Been Loving You Too Long (To Stop Now)" and “That’s How Strong My Love Is”—along with a few lesser-known tunes—are treated with love and respect.

EDITORS’ NOTES

As the album cover says, "The Voice of Bad Company and Free Celebrates Classic Masterpieces of Memphis." Fair enough. The man best known to classic rock fans for “All Right Now,” “Feel Like Makin’ Love," and “Can’t Get Enough” headed down to the legendary Royal Studios in Memphis and cut this album of songs best associated with that city's Stax Records (and a few others originally recorded a little further down in Muscle Shoals, Ala.). Paul Rodgers’ voice is in fine form, and the arrangements remain true to the originals, with plenty of Hammond B-3 organ, acoustic and electric piano, Memphis horns, smooth in-the-pocket drums, and electric bass, all true to the sounds of the '60s and early '70s. Versions of Ann Peebles’ “I Can’t Stand the Rain,” Albert King’s “Born Under a Bad Sign,” and Otis Redding’s “I’ve Been Loving You Too Long (To Stop Now)" and “That’s How Strong My Love Is”—along with a few lesser-known tunes—are treated with love and respect.

TITLE TIME
3:10
2:17
4:05
5:36
3:15
6:49
2:38
3:05
4:08
6:31

About Paul Rodgers

A dominant voice in the evolution of British blues, Paul Rodgers formed the band Free while he was still a teenager, writing and singing lead on their biggest song, 1970’s "All Right Now," before he'd turned 21. Within a couple of years, the Middlesbrough, UK-born Rodgers moved on to form Bad Company, purveying a tough, steady, unpretentiously direct sound whose peaks—“Bad Company,” “Shooting Star,” “Feel Like Makin' Love,” all of which he wrote or cowrote—became hallmarks of FM radio and helped define '70s hard rock. For as expressive as they could be, Bad Company were surprisingly stripped-down, eschewing the excess of the post-psychedelic era for a workmanlike austerity that might, in some other context, scan almost as punk. Just revisit the band’s 1974 debut (and the first release on Led Zeppelin’s Swan Song label), a bone-dry slab of crunchy guitars and booming drums, anchored by Rodgers. His powerful voice marries tenderness and pure muscle and has inspired a generation of vocalists from Freddie Mercury and Ronnie Van Zandt to Bon Jovi and beyond. Reflecting on his own influences, Rodgers said he loved blues and soul in part because technical proficiency always came second to feeling. “They weren’t demonstrating their great singing ability,” he said in an interview with No Depression. “They were expressing an emotion and delivering it.”

HOMETOWN
Middlesbrough, England
GENRE
Rock
BORN
December 17, 1949

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