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The Search

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Reseña de álbum

When Jay Farrar resurrected the sound and approach (if not the personnel) of Son Volt for the 2005 album Okemah and the Melody of Riot, it was a welcome return to what Farrar does best after the poorly focused meanderings of much of his solo work. But while embracing the Son Volt handle energized his muse on Okemah, the second album from Son Volt 2.0, The Search, suggests it has also given him a clearer vision in his search for new sonic territory. The melodic textures of The Search are very much in the mode of Son Volt's early work, but Farrar has offered a few noticeable change-ups in how he approaches the material, most noticeably the addition of Derry Deborja on keyboards, whose washes of organ and piano add new colors to the band's palate. Farrar also takes a few other chances here that pay off, particularly with the punchy soul horns on "The Picture," and though it remains clear that Farrar is in charge of this band, The Search finds this lineup of Son Volt growing into a sound of their own, with the rhythm section of Andrew DuPlantis and Dave Bryson sounding more comfortable but also lending a stronger backbone on the more rocking material (especially the title track) and Brad Rice given more room to blend his guitar work with Farrar's Neil Young-influenced leads. And while Farrar isn't likely to get ever over his shyness about direct declarative statements in his lyrics, like Okemah The Search is clearly informed by the political and social malaise of America under George W. Bush, and Farrar's compassionate anger on "Satellite," "Adrenaline and Heresy," and the title tune is bracing and powerful. In their original incarnation, Son Volt made a brilliant debut and followed it up with a genuine disappointment, but the second time around, Farrar has followed strength with strength, and The Search is a potent reminder of why Farrar was and is one of the watershed artists of the alt-country movement.

Reseñas de clientes

Experimental, interesting, darn good

Jay Farrar keeps changing with every album - this one showcases more futuristic effects, more backwards loops, and even a horn section in "The Picture". While these steps into the experimental generally make me nostalgic for earlier Son Volt, they help the band avoid redundancy. Still some great song-writing (the highlight is "Circadian Rhythm") and some awesome rock music (best represented by "The Search").

Worth the Wait!

I really love this new album. Whereas Okemah took a few spins to grow on me, this one hit home on the first listen. The band sounds very tight and there is clearly a renewed Rock n Roll swagger coming through. The reverse guitar loop on Circadian Rhythm is beautiful. My favorites however, are the rockers, The Search, Satellite and Automatic Society. Worth the money and catch Jay and band live if you get a chance.

Pure American Sound

Jay Farrar once again goes deeper and further into the evolution of his craft with this latest Son Volt venture. Beautiful, poetic and angry at the same time...the next chapter in the evolving vision of a true American artist, speaking with a confidence that has been growing with each new release. We need more artists like Jay Farrar, support this music, it's essential!

Biografía

Fecha de formación: Chicago, IL, 1994

Género: Rock

Años de actividad: '90s, '00s, '10s

After touring in support of their 1993 masterpiece, Anodyne, the seminal alternative country band Uncle Tupelo split up over long-simmering creative differences between co-leaders Jay Farrar and Jeff Tweedy. Tweedy recruited much of the band to form Wilco, while Farrar teamed up with original Tupelo drummer Mike Heidorn to form Son Volt, the more tradition-minded of the two Tupelo offshoots. Joined by brothers Jim (bass) and Dave Boquist (guitar, fiddle, banjo, fiddle, steel guitar), the band signed...
Biografía completa