12 Songs, 47 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Ever wonder what Jethro Tull’s music would sound like in the style of the 20th-century string quartet? Wonder no more with these illuminating interpretations. “Pass the Bottle (A Christmas Song)” is a jarring, yet pleasing, reading that achieves a brilliant texture, complete with singing from Ian Anderson, the band’s lead singer.

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Ever wonder what Jethro Tull’s music would sound like in the style of the 20th-century string quartet? Wonder no more with these illuminating interpretations. “Pass the Bottle (A Christmas Song)” is a jarring, yet pleasing, reading that achieves a brilliant texture, complete with singing from Ian Anderson, the band’s lead singer.

Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
18 Ratings
18 Ratings

Nice!

Da*Man

Very cool songs, nicely done.

A must for those who love classic Tull and melody

BangaloreBoy

This is a fine bottle of classic rock wine, as played by the original composer and a sympathetic string quartet. A must for Tull fans and anyone who loves melody.

And oh yes, break out your best speakers and headphones to reward your ears!

Yes and No

Carlo Matthews

Mostly brilliant and inventive renditions of classics and lesser known pieces. John O'hara has brought much to the table, allowing his imagination to shine. Top kudos for that. The problem, ironically, is Ian! Why? I see no point to his singing (on a couple of the tunes only, thankfully) when the vocal melodies were already strong and could easily have been incorporated into the string arrangements. For example, "Wondring Aloud" is a stunning song to begin with featuring one of his most disarming melodies. It would have been so much more suggestive if he had left it to the strings. Same with "We Used to Know". Why Ian, why? Anyhoo, I hope this string concept turns into a series and we see more releases soon. Hats off to O'hara and Ian (for writing these timeless beauts in the first place).

About Ian Anderson

Probably best known as the lead vocalist, flutist, and guitarist in the progressive folk-rock band Jethro Tull, Ian Anderson has also released several albums under his own name. Born in Fife, Scotland, Anderson was interested in music from a young age, gaining influence from his father James' record collection of big band and jazz, as well as early rock & roll by Elvis Presley. The Anderson family later relocated to Blackpool where Ian finished his studies. In 1963, alongside his school friends, he formed the band the Blades, with Anderson on vocals and harmonica. The band went through several name and line-up changes and in 1967, in an attempt to move closer to London, the band moved to Luton. The group quickly fell apart and following a succession of dead-end jobs, Anderson realized that he "would never be as good as Eric Clapton" and decided to sell his electric guitar -- once owned by Lemmy from the band Motörhead -- and instead trade it for a flute. This bold move turned out to create the trademark sound for the basis of his band Jethro Tull, with Anderson learning the instrument quickly and playing in a blues-rock style. Anderson, together with Glenn Cornick (bass), Mick Abrahams (guitar), and Clive Bunker (drums), first toyed with the names Navy Blue and Bag of Blues before settling on Jethro Tull, sometimes misprinted as Jethro Toe. In 1968, the band released their debut album This Was on famous label Island Records. The album was recorded only a few months after Anderson began to play flute. It wasn't a commercial success but it did score them a residency at the Marquee club in London where Anderson would develop his iconic on-stage presence, where he would jump around in an old overcoat and stand on one leg while playing the flute. Jethro Tull went on to record many albums, with most of their success coming in the '70s from the albums Benefit (1970), Aqualung (1971), Thick as a Brick (1972), and Living in the Past (1972). Anderson has also released six solo albums under his own name, starting with 1983's "Walk Into Light," in addition to guest appearances on albums by the likes of Fairport Convention (Portmeirion) and Men Without Hats ("On Tuesday"). He also produced music for Steeleye Span's 1974 album Now We Are Six. Aside from music, Anderson's business activities included owning several salmon farms in the U.K. ~ James Pearce

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