12 Songs, 1 Hour 59 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Oklahoma’s psychedelic pop purveyors are masters at wrapping emotionally heavy proclamations inside cosmic blasts of sonic bliss. This is best exemplified on 2002’s Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots, where The Flaming Lips deliver a gorgeous, tearjerking meditation on death (“Do You Realize??”). Thematically, The Terror feels like a sequel to Yoshimi. Amid whirring, warbling layers of sound, the Lips create a dark, post-apocalyptic planet that gives birth to some of their most bleak (“You Are Alone”), industrial (“Butterfly, How Long It Takes to Die”), and atmospheric compositions to date. The deluxe version of The Terror follows a celestial arc, from the opener (“Look . . . the Sun Is Rising”) through the first bonus track, "Sun Blows Up Today." It also includes a seamless mix of the album’s songs, woven together in all of their haunting, pulsating glory.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Oklahoma’s psychedelic pop purveyors are masters at wrapping emotionally heavy proclamations inside cosmic blasts of sonic bliss. This is best exemplified on 2002’s Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots, where The Flaming Lips deliver a gorgeous, tearjerking meditation on death (“Do You Realize??”). Thematically, The Terror feels like a sequel to Yoshimi. Amid whirring, warbling layers of sound, the Lips create a dark, post-apocalyptic planet that gives birth to some of their most bleak (“You Are Alone”), industrial (“Butterfly, How Long It Takes to Die”), and atmospheric compositions to date. The deluxe version of The Terror follows a celestial arc, from the opener (“Look . . . the Sun Is Rising”) through the first bonus track, "Sun Blows Up Today." It also includes a seamless mix of the album’s songs, woven together in all of their haunting, pulsating glory.

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