11 Songs, 53 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The 2005 debut from the doom-metal trio Indian starts with elements of post-rock seeping into the sludge of the opening track, “No Able Fires.” But this is hardly a bad thing. (And since Indian hails from Chicago—a.k.a. post-rock’s Ground Zero—it’s hardly avoidable.) Bill Bumgardner’s drums don’t even enter the equation until the second track, “Ration.” That song sprawls for nine minutes and 35 seconds with brontosaurus-sized guitar distortion and Ron Defries’ towering bass, which dares to dwarf four-string titan Al Cisneros. Dylan O’Toole’s hoarse howls add a nice hint of black metal here and throughout The Unquiet Sky. It’s a refreshing change from the many vocalists of this genre who try to approximate pitching down Ozzy Osbourne’s singing, as if they were spinning a Black Sabbath vinyl 45 at 33 rotations per minute. Indian adds in some cosmic-sounding analog accouterments to “Dead Weight” as O’Toole spits out demonic hisses, sounding a bit like Gaahl from Gorgoroth at times. “Loophole Noose” boasts more than five minutes of astral guitar feedback.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The 2005 debut from the doom-metal trio Indian starts with elements of post-rock seeping into the sludge of the opening track, “No Able Fires.” But this is hardly a bad thing. (And since Indian hails from Chicago—a.k.a. post-rock’s Ground Zero—it’s hardly avoidable.) Bill Bumgardner’s drums don’t even enter the equation until the second track, “Ration.” That song sprawls for nine minutes and 35 seconds with brontosaurus-sized guitar distortion and Ron Defries’ towering bass, which dares to dwarf four-string titan Al Cisneros. Dylan O’Toole’s hoarse howls add a nice hint of black metal here and throughout The Unquiet Sky. It’s a refreshing change from the many vocalists of this genre who try to approximate pitching down Ozzy Osbourne’s singing, as if they were spinning a Black Sabbath vinyl 45 at 33 rotations per minute. Indian adds in some cosmic-sounding analog accouterments to “Dead Weight” as O’Toole spits out demonic hisses, sounding a bit like Gaahl from Gorgoroth at times. “Loophole Noose” boasts more than five minutes of astral guitar feedback.

TITLE TIME
4:33
9:35
2:49
6:48
5:39
3:05
1:04
8:27
4:13
2:38
4:58

About Indian

A Chicago, Illinois formed and based doom and sludge metal outfit, Indian formed in 2003, and quickly made a name for itself with the 2004 EP release, God Slave. A full length debut -- The Unquiet Sky -- was to creep its way into the world in 2005, which was followed by Slights and Abuse in 2007. Members Dylan O'Toole (vocals and guitar), Ron Defries (bass), and Bill Bumgardner (drums) convened shortly thereafter to begin work on the next slab of doom and gloom, 2008's Seventh Rule released The Sycophant. ~ Chris True

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