iTunes

Opening the iTunes Store.If iTunes doesn't open, click the iTunes application icon in your Dock or on your Windows desktop.Progress Indicator
Opening the iBooks Store.If iBooks doesn't open, click the iBooks app in your Dock.Progress Indicator
iTunes

iTunes is the world's easiest way to organize and add to your digital media collection.

We are unable to find iTunes on your computer. To preview and buy music from The Yes Album (Deluxe Edition) by Yes, download iTunes now.

Already have iTunes? Click I Have iTunes to open it now.

I Have iTunes Free Download
iTunes for Mac + PC

The Yes Album (Deluxe Edition)

Open iTunes to preview, buy, and download music.

Editors’ Notes

Yes emerged at the end of the ‘60s poised to merge psychedelic rock with a heavier classical presence that would perfectly sync with the exploratory nature of the emerging FM radio band, where extended instrumental workouts and unconventional approaches were welcomed and championed. With its third album, Yes hit upon a winning formula, writing songs that delivered a punch but with plenty of room to showcase the band’s impressive musical chops, right down to Chris Squire's dexterous bass playing. "Yours Is No Disgrace" and "I've Seen All Good People" veer nearest to pop with hooks that allow audiences to sing and sway along. However, the group's artistic interests are even more aligned with the supernatural futurism of "Starship Trooper" where guitarist Steve Howe builds the rocket ship that blasts off into space and helps send the band into the concert halls towards a devoted following of fellow spacelords. Tracks such as "A Venture" with its carefully calibrated harmony vocals and "The Clap" with its sparse acoustic touches represent the less celebrated areas of the band's breadth. Enjoy.

Customer Reviews

Yes's first true Prog album

First, let me start by saying I don't know what the deal with the "clean" lyrics are, as Yes never used explatives in their music. On this 1971 album, Yes finally lived up to their potential shown on their first two albums, but hte biggest change here is Steve Howe taking over on guitar for Peter Banks. Howe was one of very few prog-rockers to use the pedal steel guitar, giving him a unique sound. 1. "Yours Is No Disgrace": Opening with big, blocky chords and powerful organ fills, this nearly 10-minute opus was Yes's longest piece to date. Overall, it is a hard rocking affair with lyrics that inspire visions of what could be scenes from a sci-fi novel. There are several acoustic breaks which highlights Jon Anderson's voice, and Howe's acoustic guitar solo over Squire's thumping bass and Kaye's lush organ is an additional highpoint. Score: 10/10 2. "The Clap": A live recording of an acoustic guitar workout highlights Howe's prowess on the instrument as well as his ability as a musical composer. 8.5/10 3. "Starship Trooper": One of Yes's best overall works. "Life Seeker" is a (relatively) simple section with no elaborate solos, but many subtleties ranging from Howe's distorted guitar, to Kaye's swirling organ, to Bruford's complex drumming. "Disillusionment" opens with a speedy acoustic theme and beautiful vocal harmonies before going back to the "Life Seeker" sound. "Wurm", the instrumental coda, contains one of Steve Howe's best solos of all time. 9.5/10 4. "I've Seen All Good People": Yes's first mainstream hit, it is a mostly acoustic, mandolin-driven, chess-centric work with some of Anderson's best vocals, and Tony Kaye's piano flourishes add an additional layer to the already complex and textured music. The second part is harder-rocking and closes with an organ-powered outro and more beautiful vocal harmonies. 8.5/10 5. "A Venture": This work is obviously driven by Kaye's keyboards. His organs fill in the blank spots and his piano provides a crisp lead. Bruford's drumming is excellent, and Anderson shows off his great voice. 8/10 6. "Perpetual Change": Opening with blocky chords on organ and guitar, this song quickly turns into alternating sections of toned-down jazz-rock and full-out prog. The chorus includes excellent vocal interplay between Anderson and the other four members of Yes. It contains an excellent jazz guitar solo courtesy of Steve Howe and a powerful outro padded out with wordless vocals. 10/10

One of the best Yes albums

This album is a progressive rock masterpiece! A bunch of my favorite Yes songs are in this album like Yours is no Disgrace, Starship Trooper, and I've seen all good people. Clap is another beatiful acoustic guitar piece that Steve Howe performs. Apart from how the songs sound, is the under appreciated complexity of these songs. There are some crazy riffs on the guitar and bass and some amazing keyboard. This album has it all and is a must buy for progressive rock fans and classic rock fans.

my fave Yes

Let me say that Yes is my favorite group though my collection includes every genre except Opera and Rap, and is heavy on Jazz and Fusion and Classical, especially Sibelius and Grieg. Yes, I even have a bunch of Anime/J-POP for those wondering if I really mean every genre. "The Yes Album" contains my very favorite tune, "Starship Trooper". This masterpiece is simply brilliant and is often the encore at a Yes concert. Its movement and flow just reach in and touch your soul. "Close to the Edge" is a close second for favorite albums, with my second and third favorite songs ("And you and I" and "Close to the Edge" respectively). Fragile is a great close third favorite album. The early seventies were a prolific time for Anderson, Squire, and company. You cannot go wrong with this album or any of these named albums if you want to explore perfectly crafted progressive rock; music that will reach in and grab your soul and move with it.

Biography

Formed: 1968 in Birmingham, England

Genre: Rock

Years Active: '60s, '70s, '80s, '90s, '00s, '10s

Far and away the longest lasting and the most successful of the '70s progressive rock groups, Yes proved to be one of the lingering success stories from that musical genre. The band, founded in 1968, overcame a generational shift in its audience and the departure of its most visible members at key points in its history to reach the end of the century as the definitive progressive rock band. Their audience remained huge because they had always attracted younger...
Full Bio