10 Songs, 56 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

On his first solo album since 1999’s Defying Gravity, John Elefante recalls his glory days as lead singer of Kansas while delivering fervent testimonies of Christian faith. The soaring vocals, muscular instrumental work, and tempo-shifting arrangements that have long characterized his work are abundant here. Richly textured tracks like “How the Story Goes" (featuring extended solos by Kansas violinist Dave Ragsdale and guitarist Rich Williams), “Where Have All the Old Days Gone” (a track bristling with arena-rock swagger), and “Don’t Hide Away” (riding a dynamic, Steve Winwood–like soul groove) display both substantial songcraft and a widescreen production touch. “We All Fall Short” and “Confess” lean more toward the acoustic side, while “The Awakening” has an expansive, almost New Age feel. “This Time”—a narrative song with a pro-life message—may be the album’s boldest lyric statement. On My Way to the Sun finds Elefante at the top of his powers, praising his Creator while making some of the best music of his career.

EDITORS’ NOTES

On his first solo album since 1999’s Defying Gravity, John Elefante recalls his glory days as lead singer of Kansas while delivering fervent testimonies of Christian faith. The soaring vocals, muscular instrumental work, and tempo-shifting arrangements that have long characterized his work are abundant here. Richly textured tracks like “How the Story Goes" (featuring extended solos by Kansas violinist Dave Ragsdale and guitarist Rich Williams), “Where Have All the Old Days Gone” (a track bristling with arena-rock swagger), and “Don’t Hide Away” (riding a dynamic, Steve Winwood–like soul groove) display both substantial songcraft and a widescreen production touch. “We All Fall Short” and “Confess” lean more toward the acoustic side, while “The Awakening” has an expansive, almost New Age feel. “This Time”—a narrative song with a pro-life message—may be the album’s boldest lyric statement. On My Way to the Sun finds Elefante at the top of his powers, praising his Creator while making some of the best music of his career.

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