Thought for Food (Remastered) by The Books on Apple Music

12 Songs

EDITORS’ NOTES

Imagine an alternate universe where sonic collages are hit songs. It’s easy to picture the Books — the duo of singer/guitarist Nick Zammuto and cellist Paul De Jong and their arsenal of audio samples — inhabiting that place. Their very 21st-century music is certainly experimental, but it’s also accessible, often funny, and can be gorgeous, too. In 2011, Temporary Residence Limited released a re-mastered version of the Books’ 2002 debut, Thought for Food. The album is an early example of folktronica, a genre that challenges notions of what electronica can be: acoustic instrumental timbres are favored and prescribed notions of ambience are ignored. The opener, “Enjoy Your Worries, You May Never Have Them Again,” immediately brings the listener into the Books’ weird world. The slips and slides of acoustic guitar playing and earthy fiddling are highlighted, spoken word elements are put to inventive use, and hisses and other details are strategically deployed. The result makes sense in a nonsensical, surrealist sort of way. But this carefully constructed album isn’t about any one track; ideally it should be taken in and savored in its entirety.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Imagine an alternate universe where sonic collages are hit songs. It’s easy to picture the Books — the duo of singer/guitarist Nick Zammuto and cellist Paul De Jong and their arsenal of audio samples — inhabiting that place. Their very 21st-century music is certainly experimental, but it’s also accessible, often funny, and can be gorgeous, too. In 2011, Temporary Residence Limited released a re-mastered version of the Books’ 2002 debut, Thought for Food. The album is an early example of folktronica, a genre that challenges notions of what electronica can be: acoustic instrumental timbres are favored and prescribed notions of ambience are ignored. The opener, “Enjoy Your Worries, You May Never Have Them Again,” immediately brings the listener into the Books’ weird world. The slips and slides of acoustic guitar playing and earthy fiddling are highlighted, spoken word elements are put to inventive use, and hisses and other details are strategically deployed. The result makes sense in a nonsensical, surrealist sort of way. But this carefully constructed album isn’t about any one track; ideally it should be taken in and savored in its entirety.

TITLE TIME
4:06
3:49
2:42
3:22
4:18
5:05
4:11
2:56
2:08
3:48
1:08
1:09

About The Books

The Books' story began in 2000, when Nick Zammuto and Paul de Jong met through a friend in New York City. Sharing similar interests but different backgrounds in acoustic music and found sound, Zammuto and de Jong experimented and plunked away with a mix of melody, electronics, and ethereal atmospherics. Eventually, with some urging by Tom Steinle of Tomlab Records, they created what would become their debut record, Thought for Food, in 2002. Within a year, the Books relocated to Hot Springs, NC, and recorded and released The Lemon of Pink. With a lot of favorable word of mouth and critical buzz from the first two records, the Books relocated again in the winter of 2004 and recorded in an old Victorian home in North Adams, MA. These sessions culminated with the release of Lost and Safe in April of 2005, their third album for Tomlab. The band basically disappeared in the years that followed, until launching a short tour in the autumn of 2009. Their fourth album, Way Out, was released by new label Temporary Residence in July 2010. ~ David Serra

  • ORIGIN
    New York, NY
  • FORMED
    2000

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