10 Songs, 42 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Fans were surprised, and somewhat disappointed, that 2008’s Till Death Do Us Part didn’t revel in the satanic imagery that had long been Deicide’s stock-in-trade. While the lyrics and cover art (adapted from a 16th-century Hans Baldung painting) might not refer specifically to anti-Christian themes, the album qualifies as a genuine exorcism. It was written in the wake of singer Glen Benton’s bitter divorce and ensuing custody battle. Benton later called this a “revenge record,” and within these songs you can feel him expunging every last ounce of a very personal form of frustration and anger. Many of the songs delve into vintage speed metal and end up sounding more like fits of rage than the locked-in grooves of older Deicide albums. That’s not a bad thing: “Angel of Agony,” “Hate of All Hatreds,” and “In the Eyes of God” offer some of the most thrilling moments of the band’s career. While the music is fueled by immediate feelings of anger, it also displays some incredible musical development in the form of the introductory and closing instrumentals, both written and played entirely by drummer Steve Asheim.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Fans were surprised, and somewhat disappointed, that 2008’s Till Death Do Us Part didn’t revel in the satanic imagery that had long been Deicide’s stock-in-trade. While the lyrics and cover art (adapted from a 16th-century Hans Baldung painting) might not refer specifically to anti-Christian themes, the album qualifies as a genuine exorcism. It was written in the wake of singer Glen Benton’s bitter divorce and ensuing custody battle. Benton later called this a “revenge record,” and within these songs you can feel him expunging every last ounce of a very personal form of frustration and anger. Many of the songs delve into vintage speed metal and end up sounding more like fits of rage than the locked-in grooves of older Deicide albums. That’s not a bad thing: “Angel of Agony,” “Hate of All Hatreds,” and “In the Eyes of God” offer some of the most thrilling moments of the band’s career. While the music is fueled by immediate feelings of anger, it also displays some incredible musical development in the form of the introductory and closing instrumentals, both written and played entirely by drummer Steve Asheim.

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About Deicide

Controversy has plagued Florida-based quartet Deicide. During their first tour in 1992, the band was severely criticized for their statements in favor of animal sacrifices. Their Stockholm, Sweden, concert was canceled after four songs when a bomb was discovered on-stage. Led by vocalist/bass player Glen Benton, Deicide has delivered some of the goriest sounds to ever emanate from the Sunshine State. Their songs continue to radiate with the brutal attack of satanic death metal.

Formed in 1987, Deicide quickly released two demos -- Feasting the Beast in 1987 and Sacrificial in 1989 -- under the name Amon. Signing with Roadrunner Records, they changed their name and released their first full-length CD, featuring all six demo tracks, in 1990. They didn't tour until releasing their second album, Legion, in 1992. A string of albums followed, including Amon: Feasting the Beast (1993), Once Upon the Cross (1995), Serpents of the Light (1997), the live When Satan Lives (1998), Insineratehymn (2000), In Torment, In Hell (2001), Scars of the Crucifix (2004), and Stench of Redemption (2006). Deicide's Till Death Do Us Part was released on Earache Records in April 2008. ~ Craig Harris

GENRE
Rock
FORMED
1987

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