7 Songs, 37 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

As on his 2006 full length debut, Time Without Consequence, Towards the Sun features quiet and sublime music that sounds like it was created in and for the wee hours. Scotsman Alexi Murdoch recorded these tracks on acoustic guitar one night while on tour and then had Beirut’s Jon Natchez, the National’s Kyle Resnick, and a few other musicians add overdubs later. This approach captures the intimacy and immediacy of the songs while also allowing for a fuller sound. In this context fuller still means understated and subtle and the backing musicians do much to support Murdoch’s flowing melodies and hypnotically repetitive guitar picking. The ghostly piano notes near the end of the title track and throughout “Slow Revolution,” the delicate horns of “At Your Door” and “Crinan Wood,” and the light percussion featured on “Some Day Soon” all prove to be essential touches. Though subdued, Murdoch is confident and secure musically, his rich voice filled with longing as he delivers poetic lyrics that are introspective without being sentimental.

EDITORS’ NOTES

As on his 2006 full length debut, Time Without Consequence, Towards the Sun features quiet and sublime music that sounds like it was created in and for the wee hours. Scotsman Alexi Murdoch recorded these tracks on acoustic guitar one night while on tour and then had Beirut’s Jon Natchez, the National’s Kyle Resnick, and a few other musicians add overdubs later. This approach captures the intimacy and immediacy of the songs while also allowing for a fuller sound. In this context fuller still means understated and subtle and the backing musicians do much to support Murdoch’s flowing melodies and hypnotically repetitive guitar picking. The ghostly piano notes near the end of the title track and throughout “Slow Revolution,” the delicate horns of “At Your Door” and “Crinan Wood,” and the light percussion featured on “Some Day Soon” all prove to be essential touches. Though subdued, Murdoch is confident and secure musically, his rich voice filled with longing as he delivers poetic lyrics that are introspective without being sentimental.

TITLE TIME
4:42
2:54
4:47
5:55
5:30
4:50
8:43

About Alexi Murdoch

In late 2003, things picked up rapidly and a bit weirdly for folkie Alexi Murdoch. Moving to balmy Los Angeles from Scotland in the late '90s, Murdoch let the sleepy, weepy U.K. folk sound seep into indie and lo-fi influences. But he never did much with his music beyond some local gigs, he worried about damaging his personal attachment to the songs. That was until September 2003, when Murdoch appeared on Nic Harcourt's tastemaking Morning Becomes Eclectic show on the L.A. public radio outlet KCRW. The singer's halting, tender vocals and understated acoustic guitar work made a huge impact, and suddenly, savvy music licensers -- not to mention major labels -- were knocking on the Scotsman's door. He performed at the Sundance Film Festival in January 2004, was slated for SXSW that March, and made all the teenagers cry when his dusty, melancholy "Orange Sky" tinged a particularly sentimental moment on the breakout Fox TV hit The O.C.

Murdoch took his sudden and unexpected success in stride, promoting his self-released EP Four Songs and planning a spring U.S. tour while continuing to field offers from the clamoring major labels. However, not finding the right offer, Murdoch decided to again independently record and issue his first full-length, 2006's Time Without Consequence, which contained three of the four songs also included on his EP. ~ Johnny Loftus

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