13 Songs, 39 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Train a Comin’ marks the major turning point in both Steve Earle’s personal and professional lives. Not only had he decided to turn his back on the Nashville establishment he had worked so long to break into, he had also ended a lifelong drug addiction following a three-year jail sentence that ended just before Train a Comin’ was recorded. “Mercenary Song,” “Tom Ames’ Prayer,” and “Ben McCulloch” are three standouts that date back to the ‘70s, when Earle would hone songs with his peers as they gathered at Guy Clark’s house. “Nothin’ Without You” is Earle’s sweetest song, but it is “Goodbye”— with its devastatingly frank acknowledgement of Earle’s drug addiction — that shows us just how painful a love song can be. The Beatles’ “I’m Looking Through You” is one of the first songs Earle learned to play on guitar, while “Rivers of Babylon” is a prayer of restoration and humility for the newly sober artist. The album concludes with “Tecumseh Valley,” written by Earle’s mentor Townes Van Zandt and performed with a consideration and candidness that that respects both the author and the song.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Train a Comin’ marks the major turning point in both Steve Earle’s personal and professional lives. Not only had he decided to turn his back on the Nashville establishment he had worked so long to break into, he had also ended a lifelong drug addiction following a three-year jail sentence that ended just before Train a Comin’ was recorded. “Mercenary Song,” “Tom Ames’ Prayer,” and “Ben McCulloch” are three standouts that date back to the ‘70s, when Earle would hone songs with his peers as they gathered at Guy Clark’s house. “Nothin’ Without You” is Earle’s sweetest song, but it is “Goodbye”— with its devastatingly frank acknowledgement of Earle’s drug addiction — that shows us just how painful a love song can be. The Beatles’ “I’m Looking Through You” is one of the first songs Earle learned to play on guitar, while “Rivers of Babylon” is a prayer of restoration and humility for the newly sober artist. The album concludes with “Tecumseh Valley,” written by Earle’s mentor Townes Van Zandt and performed with a consideration and candidness that that respects both the author and the song.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
17 Ratings

17 Ratings

old rock man ,

Steve Proves He Belongs

Steve came out jail without a record company so with the help of some old friends this album was released on an independent label (WInter Harvest) to rave reviews. Steve basically was giving the finger to mainstream music and the whole Nashville establishment and people loved it. Many standouts here but my favorites are Goodbye, Ben McCulloch, & Sometimes She Forgets. Steve didn't dangle long after this with Warner Bros signing him up and quickly getting I Feel Alright recorded the next year.

ragmop ,

Why does iTunes hide this album?!

For some reason a "Steve Earle" search omits this album and its songs from his iTunes page. I only found it with a specific "Train a Comin'" search. New fans to Steve are missing out on this gem. Please fIx this glitch, iTunes!

weasel warrior ,

steve earle

just when u think steve couldn't get any better, awesome album ! earle rocks the blue grass

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