37 Songs, 2 Hours 18 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Perhaps it’s because music comes so easily to Paul McCartney that it often sounds as if he’s in the recording studio even when he’s performing in front of tens of thousands of fans. There aren't rough edges, just variations concerning the sound of his performances—and much of that is the result of the equipment available at the time of the recordings. This extensive live album was McCartney’s first since the excellent Wings Over America; it covers his 1989-1990 tour in support of Flowers in the Dirt, an album highly praised upon its release. McCartney combines highlights from that album with an extensive look at his Beatles catalog, including many songs The Beatles never performed live (“Got to Get You into My Life,” “The Long and Winding Road,” “The Fool on the Hill,” “Eleanor Rigby,” “Back in the U.S.S.R.,” “Hey Jude,” “Let It Be”). Such legendary material makes it hard for the more recent material to stand its ground, but McCartney’s such a peerless performer that he slides from one era to another without losing a beat. 

EDITORS’ NOTES

Perhaps it’s because music comes so easily to Paul McCartney that it often sounds as if he’s in the recording studio even when he’s performing in front of tens of thousands of fans. There aren't rough edges, just variations concerning the sound of his performances—and much of that is the result of the equipment available at the time of the recordings. This extensive live album was McCartney’s first since the excellent Wings Over America; it covers his 1989-1990 tour in support of Flowers in the Dirt, an album highly praised upon its release. McCartney combines highlights from that album with an extensive look at his Beatles catalog, including many songs The Beatles never performed live (“Got to Get You into My Life,” “The Long and Winding Road,” “The Fool on the Hill,” “Eleanor Rigby,” “Back in the U.S.S.R.,” “Hey Jude,” “Let It Be”). Such legendary material makes it hard for the more recent material to stand its ground, but McCartney’s such a peerless performer that he slides from one era to another without losing a beat. 

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Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
31 Ratings
31 Ratings
Jackson.e

Fantastic!!!!!

I find this live album the best since his album with Wings in 1976 "Wings Over America", with hopes of iTunes adding more of Paul's albums back, I will enjoy his next great music record.

opieman

saw this one

the ultimate concert. but then again many of his are.
crank it up, get out the bic lighter and sing your lungs out
with it.

sportboy6

The Best of the Live McCartney Releases

Before he began to rely on Auto-Tune to bolster and hide his now fading voice, McCartney released this extravaganza which was absolute ear candy to all of us Beatle fans who longed to here the classic songs performed live. His previous live effort, "Wings over America" in 1976 gave the fans only a small taste. With this release, McCartney fully embraced his Beatle past. I got the opportunity to see this show and was totally blown away. The musicianship of McCartney along with Robbie McIntosh, Hamish Stuart, Paul "Wix" Wickens, Chris Whitten, and Linda McCartney was very,very good. The only minor disappointments are with the musical numbers where horns were present in the original versions. These sound a little cheesey in places, with synthesizers being utilized to fill those horn breaks. The other disappointment is that with respect to "Ebony And Ivory" , McCartney chose not to use the performance from the tour stop in Los Angeles that included the special guest appearance of Stevie Wonder. As a bonus, some songs from the soundchecks were included as well to add a little something extra so as to make it something more than just another live album. Of these, "Matchbox" totally rocks and is my personal favorite. This album takes the absolute best performances from several different dates on this world tour and gives the listener a satisfying experience.

About Paul McCartney

As Beatlemania was transforming rock ’n’ roll from passing teen fad to permanent pop-cultural movement, Paul McCartney (born in Liverpool in 1942) became the driving force behind the band’s rapid, dramatic maturation. In just two years, he had graduated from the Little Richard worship of 1963’s “I Saw Her Standing There” to the exquisite orchestral balladry of “Yesterday”—a shift that intensified the contrast between McCartney and his increasingly acerbic songwriting partner, John Lennon. But as The Beatles’ entered their late-’60s experimental phase—during which Lennon’s avant-garde impulses came to the fore—McCartney’s traditionalism constituted its own form of radicalism. Within the band’s psychedelic milieu, his embrace of pre-rock forms, like classical (“Eleanor Rigby”) and English music-hall serenades (“When I’m Sixty-Four”), felt no less surreal than The Beatles' use of tape-loop freak-outs and sitar drones. (And this is to say nothing of Paul's sublime bass playing, which elevated the four-string from rhythmic undercurrent to melodic focal point.) His post-Beatles albums have proven equally uncanny and influential: 1971’s art-folk opus Ram provided the lo-fi schematic for future generations of DIY home-recording artists, while the arena-rattling roar of “Jet,” from McCartney's subsequent band Wings’ 1973 LP Band on the Run, shows why he’s become a muse to hard rockers such as Dave Grohl. And by continually collaborating with the hitmakers of the day—from Michael Jackson in the 1980s to Rihanna and Kanye West in the 2010s—he has remained a voracious pop omnivore, as connected to music's past as its future.

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