12 Songs, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Ultramarine is the first full-length album of new material from Hershey, Pa., dream-poppers The Ocean Blue since 1999's Davy Jones' Locker. Picking up where the six-song 2005 Waterworks EP left us hanging, Ultramarine brings us back to the late '80s, when the pre-grunge alternative scene celebrated the shimmering guitars and keyboards of bands like The Smiths (whose "There Is a Light That Never Goes Out" was covered on an early Ocean Blue EP and became a popular encore), Echo & The Bunnymen, and The Go-Betweens. The band retains the core of singer/guitarist David Schelzel and bassist Bobby Mittan, along with guitarist/keyboardist Oed Ronnie (who joined in 1993) and drummer Peter Anderson (added in 2000). The heady ambience of "Sad Night, Where Is Morning?" and "New York 6AM" show a rust-free quartet working at the peak of its powers. From the Morrissey-like croon of "Blow My Mind" to the slowly ticking drums and sweetly arpeggiated guitars of "Touch Down on Earth," The Ocean Blue lets us know the alternative '80s aren't over until it says they're over.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Ultramarine is the first full-length album of new material from Hershey, Pa., dream-poppers The Ocean Blue since 1999's Davy Jones' Locker. Picking up where the six-song 2005 Waterworks EP left us hanging, Ultramarine brings us back to the late '80s, when the pre-grunge alternative scene celebrated the shimmering guitars and keyboards of bands like The Smiths (whose "There Is a Light That Never Goes Out" was covered on an early Ocean Blue EP and became a popular encore), Echo & The Bunnymen, and The Go-Betweens. The band retains the core of singer/guitarist David Schelzel and bassist Bobby Mittan, along with guitarist/keyboardist Oed Ronnie (who joined in 1993) and drummer Peter Anderson (added in 2000). The heady ambience of "Sad Night, Where Is Morning?" and "New York 6AM" show a rust-free quartet working at the peak of its powers. From the Morrissey-like croon of "Blow My Mind" to the slowly ticking drums and sweetly arpeggiated guitars of "Touch Down on Earth," The Ocean Blue lets us know the alternative '80s aren't over until it says they're over.

TITLE TIME
3:56
3:52
3:59
3:21
3:44
3:35
3:55
4:10
3:11
2:51
3:39
3:46

About The Ocean Blue

Hershey, Pennsylvania alternative pop band the Ocean Blue were formed in 1987 by singer/guitarist David Schelzel, keyboardist Steve Lau, and bassist Bobby Mittan, longtime schoolmates who shared an affection for college radio favorites including U2, Echo & the Bunnymen, the Smiths, and R.E.M. With the addition of drummer Rob Minnig, the group signed to Sire the following year, issuing its self-titled 1989 debut within months of graduating high school; the record immediately found favor on alternative radio, notching the hits "Between Something and Nothing" and "Drifting, Falling."

The Ocean Blue's sophomore effort, Cerulean, appeared in 1991, continuing the atmospheric approach of its predecessor; the title track performed well on the modern rock charts, although the album didn't chart. Beneath the Rhythm and Sound surfaced two years later, with the video for "Sublime" becoming an MTV favorite. Released in 1994, the Peace and Light EP closed out the Ocean Blue's Sire contract, and was also Lau's final recording with the group -- he left to form his own label (Kinetic). Guitarist/keyboardist Oed Ronne was recruited for their 1996 Mercury debut See the Ocean Blue; 1999's Davy Jones' Locker appeared on the band's own Ocean Blue label prior to being reissued and distributed by March Records/What Are Records? in early 2001. This was followed by the six-song EP Waterworks in 2004, featuring new drummer Peter Anderson, who replaced Rob Minnig. In 2013, the Ocean Blue returned with the full-length studio album Ultramarine. ~ Jason Ankeny

  • ORIGIN
    Hershey, PA

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