10 Songs, 39 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Joy Division’s 1979 debut is, at once, glistening and foreboding. Its atmospheric production and Ian Curtis’ dramatic croon—shot through with scything guitars, cutting synthlines, and booming bass—combine to create an eerie sense of disconnection and distance. The punchy and anxious “Shadowplay,” the echo-heavy “She’s Lost Control,” and the rifftastic “Interzone” are perfect, if not sinister, storms of punk and dance. Other tunes, like pop-brooder “New Dawn Fades” and the tribal-dirge of an album closer, “I Remember Nothing,” set the stage for the coming darkness that was goth rock.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Joy Division’s 1979 debut is, at once, glistening and foreboding. Its atmospheric production and Ian Curtis’ dramatic croon—shot through with scything guitars, cutting synthlines, and booming bass—combine to create an eerie sense of disconnection and distance. The punchy and anxious “Shadowplay,” the echo-heavy “She’s Lost Control,” and the rifftastic “Interzone” are perfect, if not sinister, storms of punk and dance. Other tunes, like pop-brooder “New Dawn Fades” and the tribal-dirge of an album closer, “I Remember Nothing,” set the stage for the coming darkness that was goth rock.

TITLE TIME

More By Joy Division

You May Also Like