9 Songs, 39 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

After a decade of recording, Matthew Perryman Jones has built up an estimable body of work, known for its literate lyricism and bittersweet tunefulness. For this album, Jones selects seven tunes from his three studio albums and matches them with two new compositions. The modern-rock production of his earlier releases has been replaced by an acoustic focus, with light percussion and strings adding richness to the guitars and pianos. Jones’ tenor vocals remain capable of conveying tenderness and resolute strength within a single line. Among the selections here, “Beneath the Silver Moon” (a loving salute to his father) and the lullaby-like “Meghan’s Song” (written for his wife) underscore his deep commitment to family. Jones’ spiritual outlook — not always orthodox, but still fervent — are conveyed with a taut, aching power in “Waiting for the Light to Change” and “Homage for the Suffering.” Until the Dawn Appears benefits from the artist’s greater maturity and self-knowledge, making these retold tales definitely worth hearing.

EDITORS’ NOTES

After a decade of recording, Matthew Perryman Jones has built up an estimable body of work, known for its literate lyricism and bittersweet tunefulness. For this album, Jones selects seven tunes from his three studio albums and matches them with two new compositions. The modern-rock production of his earlier releases has been replaced by an acoustic focus, with light percussion and strings adding richness to the guitars and pianos. Jones’ tenor vocals remain capable of conveying tenderness and resolute strength within a single line. Among the selections here, “Beneath the Silver Moon” (a loving salute to his father) and the lullaby-like “Meghan’s Song” (written for his wife) underscore his deep commitment to family. Jones’ spiritual outlook — not always orthodox, but still fervent — are conveyed with a taut, aching power in “Waiting for the Light to Change” and “Homage for the Suffering.” Until the Dawn Appears benefits from the artist’s greater maturity and self-knowledge, making these retold tales definitely worth hearing.

TITLE TIME

More By Matthew Perryman Jones

You May Also Like