11 Songs, 46 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Red’s muscular brand of Christian rock has found favor among believers and secular fans alike. This time, vocalist Michael Barnes leads his comrades through a spiritual war zone as guitarist Anthony Armstrong lays down ferocious riffage and newly recruited drummer Joe Rickard applies punishing beats. Taking its title from a C.S. Lewis novel, the album traces a quest for personal identity amidst the conflict and chaos of the mortal world. Barnes unleashes throat-searing growls on such blistering tracks like “Feed the Machine,” “Outside” and “Faceless,” matching the intensity of the lyrics. The defiant “Who We Are” is an especially searing chunk of nü-metal, defined by Armstrong’s serrated axemanship. Until We Have Faces has more to offer than continuous aggression, however. The atmospheric, synthesizer-driven “Not Alone” is an eloquent number sung from the viewpoint of the Savior. The album closer “Hymn for the Missing” achieves a melancholy grandeur as it mourns the loss of a loved one amidst piano and strings.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Red’s muscular brand of Christian rock has found favor among believers and secular fans alike. This time, vocalist Michael Barnes leads his comrades through a spiritual war zone as guitarist Anthony Armstrong lays down ferocious riffage and newly recruited drummer Joe Rickard applies punishing beats. Taking its title from a C.S. Lewis novel, the album traces a quest for personal identity amidst the conflict and chaos of the mortal world. Barnes unleashes throat-searing growls on such blistering tracks like “Feed the Machine,” “Outside” and “Faceless,” matching the intensity of the lyrics. The defiant “Who We Are” is an especially searing chunk of nü-metal, defined by Armstrong’s serrated axemanship. Until We Have Faces has more to offer than continuous aggression, however. The atmospheric, synthesizer-driven “Not Alone” is an eloquent number sung from the viewpoint of the Savior. The album closer “Hymn for the Missing” achieves a melancholy grandeur as it mourns the loss of a loved one amidst piano and strings.

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About Red

Post-grunge outfit RED first got their start in Pennsylvania playing contemporary Christian covers to area youth groups. They soon grew tired of pop songs, however, and began crafting their own hard-edged rock tunes that often confronted personal issues from their lives. According to lead singer Mike Barnes, the name RED was chosen as a symbol "for the blood of Christ and what it represents: passion, pain, but ultimately, redemption." Comprising Barnes, Jasen Rauch (guitar), Hayden Lamb (drummer), and identical twins Anthony Armstrong (guitar/vocals) and Randy Armstrong (bass/piano/vocals), the group cited influences from bands like Chevelle, Linkin Park, and Muse.

Spearheaded by the single "Breathe into Me," RED's first nationally distributed album, End of Silence, was released in June 2006 on Essential Records. Always wanting to directly connect with fans through their energetic live show, the band spent the summer touring nationwide, including dates at multiple festivals. A van crash put injured drummer Hayden Lamb on the sidelines for their 2007 headlining tour, but RED soldiered on -- gaining mass appeal with their rapidly growing CCM fanbase. Later in 2007, the band took home the Rock Recorded Song of the Year award at the 38th annual GMA Dove Awards. Innocence & Instinct appeared in 2009, followed by Release the Panic early in 2013. A remix version of the latter LP, Release the Panic: Recalibrated, preceded the arrival of the group's fifth studio long-player, 2015's Of Beauty and Rage, which was promoted with a graphic novel telling the story behind the album. September 2017 saw the band drop a pair of singles, "Still Alive" and "Losing Control," in anticipation of the release of the full-length Gone, which arrived later that October. ~ Corey Apar

ORIGIN
Nashville, TN
GENRE
Rock
FORMED
2004

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