9 Songs, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Recorded informally at 501 Canal Street, the communal house and performance space in Lower Manhattan where the late David S. Ware got his start, Valley of Search documents a vibrant moment in what was known as the loft jazz scene, when adventurous improvisers broke new ground in gritty DIY venues. Alan Braufman, on alto sax and flute, didn’t know he was making a cult classic of the period when he gathered with this quintet and played two short sets. The players were mostly housemates, including multi-instrumentalist Cooper-Moore (then Gene Ashton), who opens “Rainbow Warriors” meditatively on dulcimer and launches into a Bahá'í prayer on “Chant” before taking up piano for the remainder. Bassist Cecil McBee, who went on to wider renown, is alert and responsive throughout, taking a beautiful, extended solo on “Miracles.” Drummer David Lee and percussionist Ralph Williams generate momentum and color as Braufman ranges from episodes of all-out fury (“Love Is for Real”) to rich and nuanced melody (“Destiny”).

EDITORS’ NOTES

Recorded informally at 501 Canal Street, the communal house and performance space in Lower Manhattan where the late David S. Ware got his start, Valley of Search documents a vibrant moment in what was known as the loft jazz scene, when adventurous improvisers broke new ground in gritty DIY venues. Alan Braufman, on alto sax and flute, didn’t know he was making a cult classic of the period when he gathered with this quintet and played two short sets. The players were mostly housemates, including multi-instrumentalist Cooper-Moore (then Gene Ashton), who opens “Rainbow Warriors” meditatively on dulcimer and launches into a Bahá'í prayer on “Chant” before taking up piano for the remainder. Bassist Cecil McBee, who went on to wider renown, is alert and responsive throughout, taking a beautiful, extended solo on “Miracles.” Drummer David Lee and percussionist Ralph Williams generate momentum and color as Braufman ranges from episodes of all-out fury (“Love Is for Real”) to rich and nuanced melody (“Destiny”).

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