7 Songs, 42 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though they're seldom given proper credit for it, Vanilla Fudge were the godfathers of progressive rock—a fact that their 1967 debut album makes plain. Sure, they were ostensibly a psychedelic band, but from the opening track's first moments, as singer/organist Mark Stein unleashes a baroque-styled intro to an elongated elaboration on The Beatles' "Ticket to Ride," the Fudge pursued a blend of rock 'n' roll fury and classical concepts. In that heady era, the band briefly broke through to the mainstream; their epic, barnstorming take on The Supremes' "You Keep Me Hangin' On" became a major hit, bringing the album along with it to the upper reaches of the charts. For a record that basically contained no original material (tunes by The Zombies, The Impressions, and Sonny & Cher also get Fudgified here), Vanilla Fudge was a direct and crucial influence on everything from hard rock and heavy metal (Deep Purple) and art rock (Yes) to progressive R&B (The Rotary Connection).

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though they're seldom given proper credit for it, Vanilla Fudge were the godfathers of progressive rock—a fact that their 1967 debut album makes plain. Sure, they were ostensibly a psychedelic band, but from the opening track's first moments, as singer/organist Mark Stein unleashes a baroque-styled intro to an elongated elaboration on The Beatles' "Ticket to Ride," the Fudge pursued a blend of rock 'n' roll fury and classical concepts. In that heady era, the band briefly broke through to the mainstream; their epic, barnstorming take on The Supremes' "You Keep Me Hangin' On" became a major hit, bringing the album along with it to the upper reaches of the charts. For a record that basically contained no original material (tunes by The Zombies, The Impressions, and Sonny & Cher also get Fudgified here), Vanilla Fudge was a direct and crucial influence on everything from hard rock and heavy metal (Deep Purple) and art rock (Yes) to progressive R&B (The Rotary Connection).

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Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5

51 Ratings

51 Ratings

still pretty good

Urquhart

All those psychedelic excursions from forty years ago sound a little dated, but this is still a decent effort from Vanilla Fudge, the previous reviewer's brain trauma notwithstanding. VF is more a curiosity than a classic--experimental music in an experimental time, but compared to other Vanillas--oh, Ice for instance--it's pretty good.

Vanilla Fudge

Drumsultan

Having seen this group live shortly after the release of this album, the music still holds up.
The drummer of this band (Carmine Appice) was fairly innovative. In fact, he was an influence on John Bonham who copied Carmine's style and sound. They were all fine musician's and sounded better live and did it with no overdubs.

First hand

weaned in the 60s

Guess you had to be there when it was first debuted

About Vanilla Fudge

Vanilla Fudge was one of the few American links between psychedelia and what soon became heavy metal. While the band did record original material, they were best-known for their loud, heavy, slowed-down arrangements of contemporary pop songs, blowing them up to epic proportions and bathing them in a trippy, distorted haze. Originally, Vanilla Fudge was a blue-eyed soul cover band called the Electric Pigeons, who formed in Long Island, New York, in 1965. Organist Mark Stein, bassist Tim Bogert, and drummer Joey Brennan soon shortened their name to the Pigeons and added guitarist Vince Martell. They built a following by gigging extensively up and down the East Coast, and earned extra money by providing freelance in-concert backing for girl groups. In early 1966, the group recorded a set of eight demos that were released several years later as While the Whole World Was Eating Vanilla Fudge, credited to Mark Stein & the Pigeons.

Inspired by the Vagrants, another band on the club circuit led by future Mountain guitarist Leslie West, the Pigeons began to put more effort into reimagining the arrangements of their cover songs. They got so elaborate that by the end of the year, drummer Brennan was replaced by the more technically skilled Carmine Appice. In early 1967, their manager convinced producer George "Shadow" Morton (who'd handled the girl group the Shangri-Las and had since moved into protest folk) to catch their live act. Impressed by their heavy, hard-rocking recasting of the Supremes' "You Keep Me Hangin' On," Morton offered to record the song as a single; the results landed the group a deal with the Atlantic subsidiary Atco, which requested a name change. The band settled on Vanilla Fudge, after a favorite ice cream flavor. "You Keep Me Hangin' On" didn't perform as well as hoped, but the band toured extensively behind its covers-heavy, jam-oriented debut album Vanilla Fudge, which gradually expanded their fan base. Things started to pick up for the band in 1968: early in the year, they headlined the Fillmore West with the Steve Miller Band, performed "You Keep Me Hangin' On" on The Ed Sullivan Show, and released their second album, The Beat Goes On. Despite its somewhat arty, indulgent qualities, the LP was a hit, climbing into the Top 20. That summer, Atco reissued "You Keep Me Hangin' On," and the second time around it climbed into the Top Ten. It was followed by Renaissance, one of Vanilla Fudge's best albums, which also hit the Top 20. The band supported it by touring with Jimi Hendrix, opening several dates on Cream's farewell tour, and late in the year touring again with the fledgling Led Zeppelin as their opening act.

In 1969, the band kept touring and released their first album without Morton, the expansive, symphonic-tinged Near the Beginning. After part of the band recorded a radio commercial with guitarist Jeff Beck, the idea was hatched to form a Cream-styled power trio with plenty of individual solo spotlights. Exhausted by the constant touring, the band decided that their late-1969 European tour would be their last. Following the release of their final album, Rock & Roll, Vanilla Fudge played a few U.S. farewell dates and disbanded in early 1970. Bogert and Appice first formed the hard rock group Cactus, then later joined up with Jeff Beck in the aptly named Beck, Bogert & Appice. Appice went on to become an active session and touring musician, working with a variety of rock and hard rock artists. Vanilla Fudge reunited in 1984 for the poorly received Mystery album, and, over the course of the next two decades, Vanilla Fudge would regroup for tours. These reunions often had differing lineups, always anchored by Carmine Appice and usually Tim Bogert, although the latter opted out of an early-'90s incarnation.

At the turn of the millennium, the group -- featuring Appice, Bogert, keyboardist Bill Pascali, and guitarist Vince Martell -- launched a more serious comeback heralded by the 2002 album The Return. Several other minor switches in lineup followed in the next few years and, in 2007, they featured Mark Stein on vocals/keyboards instead of Pascali. That group released Out Through the In Door in 2007. More tours followed as did the revolving membership, with the most notable departure being Bogert in 2011. He was replaced by Pete Bremy, and Vanilla Fudge launched a "farewell tour" in 2011, a tour that continued for several years. A studio album, Spirit of '67, appeared in 2015; the band described as their heaviest work to date. ~ Steve Huey

ORIGIN
New York, NY
GENRE
Rock
FORMED
1966

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