11 Songs, 48 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Expanding on her acclaimed 2011 sophomore album, Verdugo Hills, Caroline Lufkin released Verdugo Hills Remixes in 2012, offering up 11 producers’ reworkings. Eluvium’s take on the opening “Balloon” delivers a gradual swell of beautifully muted beats and looped tones to create something that recalls Boards of Canada's experimental ambient creations. Similarly, the Manual remix of “Sleep” keeps the song’s ethereal origins while filling in the cracks with subtle electro-toned drones that are hushed in the mix and separated sporadically. The song moves with the still beauty of a swan on a lake as Caroline’s gauzy vocals float over everything like a silver fog. James Scott Tamborello (a.k.a. Dntel) mixes some of his signature clipped glitches into “Seesaw,” creating a remix that plays as if Caroline were performing this song in an echo chamber accompanied by a vintage drum machine and guitar pedals patched into a quartet of Speak & Spells. Rory Vallis offers a similarly glitchy take on “Pink Gloom,” replete with backmasked organ notes for an extra-haunting effect.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Expanding on her acclaimed 2011 sophomore album, Verdugo Hills, Caroline Lufkin released Verdugo Hills Remixes in 2012, offering up 11 producers’ reworkings. Eluvium’s take on the opening “Balloon” delivers a gradual swell of beautifully muted beats and looped tones to create something that recalls Boards of Canada's experimental ambient creations. Similarly, the Manual remix of “Sleep” keeps the song’s ethereal origins while filling in the cracks with subtle electro-toned drones that are hushed in the mix and separated sporadically. The song moves with the still beauty of a swan on a lake as Caroline’s gauzy vocals float over everything like a silver fog. James Scott Tamborello (a.k.a. Dntel) mixes some of his signature clipped glitches into “Seesaw,” creating a remix that plays as if Caroline were performing this song in an echo chamber accompanied by a vintage drum machine and guitar pedals patched into a quartet of Speak & Spells. Rory Vallis offers a similarly glitchy take on “Pink Gloom,” replete with backmasked organ notes for an extra-haunting effect.

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