11 Songs, 42 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Unapologetically wearing ‘90s grunge influences on its sleeves, the Vancouver hard rock quintet Art of Dying not only recalls that time when Pacific Northwest longhairs ruled the airwaves; it also throws in some alt-metal inspiration that fans of Hinder and Incubus will immediately find familiar. In addition, Vices and Virtues abounds on the band's three-part vocal harmonies. While you can hear the members soaring on the brash opener “Die Trying,” Art of Dying's vocal prowess comes across much clearer on the arena-friendly power ballad “Sorry,” where not one note is wasted; from start to finish the band’s congruent harmonies play with an airtight flawlessness. Frontman Jonny Hetherington’s vocal versatility is put to the test all over this album. Immediately following the harmonious “Sorry,” he comes in screaming on “Whole World’s Crazy,” as though he regularly gargles with whiskey and sand. The guitar work is also notable on this tune, as Greg Bradley and Tavis Stanley go head-to-head like two alpha rams. The romantic serenade “Breathe Again” ends with plenty of room for those harmonies to stretch out.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Unapologetically wearing ‘90s grunge influences on its sleeves, the Vancouver hard rock quintet Art of Dying not only recalls that time when Pacific Northwest longhairs ruled the airwaves; it also throws in some alt-metal inspiration that fans of Hinder and Incubus will immediately find familiar. In addition, Vices and Virtues abounds on the band's three-part vocal harmonies. While you can hear the members soaring on the brash opener “Die Trying,” Art of Dying's vocal prowess comes across much clearer on the arena-friendly power ballad “Sorry,” where not one note is wasted; from start to finish the band’s congruent harmonies play with an airtight flawlessness. Frontman Jonny Hetherington’s vocal versatility is put to the test all over this album. Immediately following the harmonious “Sorry,” he comes in screaming on “Whole World’s Crazy,” as though he regularly gargles with whiskey and sand. The guitar work is also notable on this tune, as Greg Bradley and Tavis Stanley go head-to-head like two alpha rams. The romantic serenade “Breathe Again” ends with plenty of room for those harmonies to stretch out.

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.4 out of 5
408 Ratings
408 Ratings
Reality check. ,

The name wasn't stolen..

First off, bands choose album titles long before the release date. I'm sure neither panic at the disco or art of dying had any idea of them having the same names until just recently. So chill out, and put your razor blades away.
Now about the music. It all sounds pretty good to me. The singer has a voice like 3dg. All around some pretty good music. I enjoy listening to it.

Yogérto ,

Just thought you guys should know....

Art of Dying announced 'Vices & Virtues' as their album title on May 21, 2010 and would be released on March 22, 2011. Panic! At the Disco annouced the same album title on January 18, 2011 and Panic "just so happened" to release their album on the same day. Get your facts straight before you accuse a band with creativity of being thieves.

AlexRice12 ,

Unexpected.

I have never heard of this band before now, and in all honesty I wasnt expecting much, but what I found was quite unexpected. This band is actually very good and in my humble opinion has the potential to go very far with a music career. Give them a chance and I think you'll find the same thing. They even have a pretty good softer song for being a rock band. Im very impressed.

More By Art of Dying

You May Also Like