13 Songs, 47 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With the 2009 departure of songwriter/guitarist Ryan Ross and bassist Jon Walker, many fans expected Panic! at the Disco to either disband or hire new members. Unpredictably, Brendon Urie and Spencer Smith decided to forge ahead as a duo. Subsequently, 2011’s Vices & Virtues furthers Panic! at the Disco’s fascination with vaudevillian emo and hook-laden power pop, sounding as if the only noticeable change is a stronger focus on songwriting and more economical arrangements. It starts with the incredibly catchy “The Ballad of Mona Lisa,” where a dark whimsy contrasts sunny melodies in the chorus. Urie’s voice sounds so seasoned and confident, especially in the orchestra-laden “Ready to Go (Get Me out of My Mind),” which plays with just enough endearing teenage drama and ‘80s pop influences to recall the soundtracks to John Hughes’ films. Of the bonus tracks on the deluxe edition, “Stall Me” is a powerhouse of driving heartfelt guitar pop, and the demo of “Oh Glory” is danceable emo pop at its best.

EDITORS’ NOTES

With the 2009 departure of songwriter/guitarist Ryan Ross and bassist Jon Walker, many fans expected Panic! at the Disco to either disband or hire new members. Unpredictably, Brendon Urie and Spencer Smith decided to forge ahead as a duo. Subsequently, 2011’s Vices & Virtues furthers Panic! at the Disco’s fascination with vaudevillian emo and hook-laden power pop, sounding as if the only noticeable change is a stronger focus on songwriting and more economical arrangements. It starts with the incredibly catchy “The Ballad of Mona Lisa,” where a dark whimsy contrasts sunny melodies in the chorus. Urie’s voice sounds so seasoned and confident, especially in the orchestra-laden “Ready to Go (Get Me out of My Mind),” which plays with just enough endearing teenage drama and ‘80s pop influences to recall the soundtracks to John Hughes’ films. Of the bonus tracks on the deluxe edition, “Stall Me” is a powerhouse of driving heartfelt guitar pop, and the demo of “Oh Glory” is danceable emo pop at its best.

TITLE TIME
13

Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
4.2K Ratings
4.2K Ratings
elenikallinos ,

This is brilliant.

Brendon and Spencer are extremely talented and brilliant artists and words can't explain how much I love Vices and Virtues. People should stop saying that you miss the old panic because I bet they work so hard and when you say that it makes you sound
a bit unappreciative. Not many people seem to like Pretty Odd as much as A Fever You Cant Sweat Out and I can get why (although I like Pretty Odd better and think people underestimate it) but people need to understand that all great artists constantly evolve. I feel like this album is a great mixture of both albums along with a new wonderful sound. If every album of theirs sounded like their first one everyone would get really tired of listening to the same type of thing. They're still panic, and they still have that sound where there are so many various instruments along with Brendon's unique voice. Also, I don't really understand why people are so upset about shorter song titles. The title of a song doesn't define it, the music does. Again, I love this album and words can't really explain it. Kudos to panic!

Crush softball ,

UGH <3

This album shows that they have gone thorugh alot. If A Fever You Can't Sweat Out and Pretty. Odd. had a baby, it would be this. Pure amazingness. It's kinda perfect <3 Job well done Panic! :)

life is pretty. odd. ,

3rd time's a charm

This album is amazing! I love that they sort of went back to A Fever You Can't Sweat Out while also playing with some new sounds! I love it! DEFINITELY worth the money!!

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