13 Songs, 46 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

2009’s Villa Manifesto represents Slum Village’s reunion with founding members Baatin and J Dilla, both of whom passed away before the album was released. While the group’s reputation is based on the somber and often introverted moods of the two Fantastic volumes, the songs on Villa Manifesto are vigorous and celebratory. “Dance,” “Earl Flinn," and “Faster” radiate an irrepressible sense of joy, undoubtedly the result of camaraderie and love brought about by the reunion. “Lock It Down” is the sole Dilla production, and it’s a killer. The song epitomizes the harsh-yet-seductive edge that's has come to define Detroit hip-hop. Elsewhere, Dilla’s disciple Young RJ offers some of the most dynamic and well-crafted beats the group has ever had, including “Scheming,” “2000 Beyond," and “The Reunion, Pt. 2.” Overall, the album merges old-school hip-hop fundamentals with Slum’s singularly low-key, fraternal rap style. “Where Do We Go From Here?” becomes particularly poignant in light of the group’s inevitable dissolution. Elzhi’s verse forms an epigram for a tight-knit trio: “Two, only real ones on my team who knew/I found a way to make my dreams come true…”

EDITORS’ NOTES

2009’s Villa Manifesto represents Slum Village’s reunion with founding members Baatin and J Dilla, both of whom passed away before the album was released. While the group’s reputation is based on the somber and often introverted moods of the two Fantastic volumes, the songs on Villa Manifesto are vigorous and celebratory. “Dance,” “Earl Flinn," and “Faster” radiate an irrepressible sense of joy, undoubtedly the result of camaraderie and love brought about by the reunion. “Lock It Down” is the sole Dilla production, and it’s a killer. The song epitomizes the harsh-yet-seductive edge that's has come to define Detroit hip-hop. Elsewhere, Dilla’s disciple Young RJ offers some of the most dynamic and well-crafted beats the group has ever had, including “Scheming,” “2000 Beyond," and “The Reunion, Pt. 2.” Overall, the album merges old-school hip-hop fundamentals with Slum’s singularly low-key, fraternal rap style. “Where Do We Go From Here?” becomes particularly poignant in light of the group’s inevitable dissolution. Elzhi’s verse forms an epigram for a tight-knit trio: “Two, only real ones on my team who knew/I found a way to make my dreams come true…”

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