17 Songs, 1 Hour 16 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Cosmic Egg isn’t a big departure from 2006’s eponymous debut. They still sound enamored with heavy psychedelic rock of the late-‘60s and early-‘70s — so much now that Wolfmother has become part of the genre. But singer/guitarist Andrew Stockdale wisely imports some anachronistic innovation allowing Wolfmother to be considered a new branch on an old tree (rather than a mere clone). “New Moon Rising” rocks and rumbles like a denim- and leather-clad biker gang storming through a small town. Contrasting sternum-rattling rawk riffs with smart and catchy melodies comes off like a cross pollination between Black Sabbath and White Stripes. Because he wails with a natural vibrato on those high notes Stockdale will always get compared to Jack White, but musically these songs rock with an authentic authority of their own and Wolfmother’s timeless tunes like “Pilgrim” and “Phoenix” could easily be played on classic rock stations that still “get the Led out.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

Cosmic Egg isn’t a big departure from 2006’s eponymous debut. They still sound enamored with heavy psychedelic rock of the late-‘60s and early-‘70s — so much now that Wolfmother has become part of the genre. But singer/guitarist Andrew Stockdale wisely imports some anachronistic innovation allowing Wolfmother to be considered a new branch on an old tree (rather than a mere clone). “New Moon Rising” rocks and rumbles like a denim- and leather-clad biker gang storming through a small town. Contrasting sternum-rattling rawk riffs with smart and catchy melodies comes off like a cross pollination between Black Sabbath and White Stripes. Because he wails with a natural vibrato on those high notes Stockdale will always get compared to Jack White, but musically these songs rock with an authentic authority of their own and Wolfmother’s timeless tunes like “Pilgrim” and “Phoenix” could easily be played on classic rock stations that still “get the Led out.”

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Ratings and Reviews

4.7 out of 5
335 Ratings
335 Ratings
w0lfm07hr ,

Solidifies Wolfmother

I was a huge fan of the first album, and as this one approached, I grew nervous with the thoughts that their first album might have been just a stroke of good luck, or that with a new drummer, bass/keyboardist and rythem guitarist, the group would simply be sub-par. I. Was. Wrong. This album re-introduces the magically musical melodies and riffs of Andrew Stockdale's new Wolfmother with fantastic success. The first half experiments with a slightly harder, more focused rock tone with songs like Sundial and California Queen, while the second half flows with a more true rock and roll sound that reaches down deep and touches one's inner being with songs like In the Castle and Caroline. Wolfmother helps remind us of what used to make rock and roll so special. Like a phoenix, Wolfmother rises from the ashes glowing bright and beautiful. Well done.

clind7492 ,

Wolfmother revives the rock and roll scene

Every now and then you hear an album that reminds you there are still people out there making good music. With Cosmic Egg, Wolfmother revives a generation lost to impure pop and rap. Regardless of your taste in music, you should be able to appreciate this incrediblly talented band. Heavily influenced by some of the best rock and roll of the 60s and 70s, the underappeciated Andrew Stockdale and Wolfmother make their name known with this album. You can't go wrong here.

Coinciding the new release of their album, Wolfmother recently played at the 23rd annual Bridge School Benefit, hosted by Neil and Peggi Young. Neil Young stood on the side of the stage and watched Wolfmother's entire set. Neil doesn't do that for everybody...

iJunes ,

kind of annoying....?

I loved their last album, but i don't know why i cant stand them anymore. every song starts to sound the same... do you agree?

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