10 Songs, 37 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Ten years after its 2003 breakup and 12 years after its last album, The Dismemberment Plan returns and retains much of what made it a worthy band to consider in previous decades, all while sounding more relaxed and less skittish. The maturity here is natural for people 10 years older, but here it’s never at the expense of intensity or the sly weirdness that helped the band stand apart. There’s a quick, jaded wit to “Living in Song,” where the band relives its past by observing it from afar. “Lookin’” throws together a jocular flow, with note-perfect pop-harmony backing vocals and smooth keyboards remaining a steady constant behind lyrics that never sweat the small stuff. Nope; Travis Morrison, freed from solo duty, is having a blast with his sillier side on “Daddy Was a Real Good Dancer,” “Let’s Just Go to the Dogs Tonight," and “No One’s Saying Nothing,” where he’s found a computer that feeds him drugs when he hits the space bar. The other band members, sensing their leader’s engagement, play along affably.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Ten years after its 2003 breakup and 12 years after its last album, The Dismemberment Plan returns and retains much of what made it a worthy band to consider in previous decades, all while sounding more relaxed and less skittish. The maturity here is natural for people 10 years older, but here it’s never at the expense of intensity or the sly weirdness that helped the band stand apart. There’s a quick, jaded wit to “Living in Song,” where the band relives its past by observing it from afar. “Lookin’” throws together a jocular flow, with note-perfect pop-harmony backing vocals and smooth keyboards remaining a steady constant behind lyrics that never sweat the small stuff. Nope; Travis Morrison, freed from solo duty, is having a blast with his sillier side on “Daddy Was a Real Good Dancer,” “Let’s Just Go to the Dogs Tonight," and “No One’s Saying Nothing,” where he’s found a computer that feeds him drugs when he hits the space bar. The other band members, sensing their leader’s engagement, play along affably.

TITLE TIME
3:29
2:49
3:38
3:41
2:45
5:20
3:35
4:22
4:00
3:51

About The Dismemberment Plan

Washington, D.C.-based emo quartet the Dismemberment Plan -- frontman Travis Morrison, guitarist Jason Caddell, bassist Eric Axelson, and drummer Joe Easley -- debuted in 1994 with the single "Can We Be Mature?," signing to DeSoto to release the full-length ! in the fall of 1995. The Dismemberment Plan Is Terrified followed a year and a half later, and after releasing 1998's The Ice of Boston EP on major-label Interscope, the group returned to DeSoto for 1999's Emergency & I. In early 2001, the Dismemberment Plan and Juno issued the Split Release EP, which featured new songs and covers from each of the bands. Following tours with Death Cab for Cutie, the band released their fourth studio album, Change, in 2001. The band put the music of the album on the website and invited their fans to remix the songs, the results were featured on the 2002 compilation A People's History of the Dismemberment Plan. Unexpectedly in 2003, the band announced that they were splitting up and held their last "farewell" concert at Washington D.C's 9:30 Club on September 1, 2003. In 2007, the band announced they were re-forming for a one-off benefit concert for the son of J. Robbins of the band Jawbox who was diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy. Tickets for the show sold out within minutes and the band, who were overwhelmed with the positive response from the fans, announced another show but stated that this would be their last. The band would actually re-form for good in 2011, with a rafter of live dates being announced. In 2013, the band released the single "Waiting" as a precursor to their fifth studio album, Uncanney Valley, which was slated for release later that year. ~ Jason Ankeny

  • ORIGIN
    Washington, D.C.
  • GENRE
    Alternative
  • FORMED
    January 1, 1993

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