50 Songs, 2 Hours 3 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

This stellar collection could be all the Everly Brothers you’ll ever need. It boasts 50 songs that were tracked when the Everlys hit their stride, though some fans believe the duo’s 1950s Cadence Records recordings to be their peak. The first half of Walk Right Back focuses on American and English hits — the most recognizable being “Cathy’s Clown” which still resonated with 1950s tones, and of course the Sonny Curtis-penned title track as well as the tragic teen drama of “Ebony Eyes” and the Everly's first foray into Brill Building pop, “Crying In The Rain.” Standout album tracks include covers of classic Boudleaux Bryant ballads “Love Hurts” and “Sleepless Nights.” The second half opens with “The Price of Love” which was a bigger hit with 1965’s swinging London set as it grooved on the kind of R&B mod kids loved. Even though their mainstream popularity waned Stateside and they became a fan’s band by the end of the ‘60s, songs like “Bowling Green” and a psychedelic version of Jimmy Rodgers’ “T for Texas” have aged remarkably well, while helping pioneer country rock.

EDITORS’ NOTES

This stellar collection could be all the Everly Brothers you’ll ever need. It boasts 50 songs that were tracked when the Everlys hit their stride, though some fans believe the duo’s 1950s Cadence Records recordings to be their peak. The first half of Walk Right Back focuses on American and English hits — the most recognizable being “Cathy’s Clown” which still resonated with 1950s tones, and of course the Sonny Curtis-penned title track as well as the tragic teen drama of “Ebony Eyes” and the Everly's first foray into Brill Building pop, “Crying In The Rain.” Standout album tracks include covers of classic Boudleaux Bryant ballads “Love Hurts” and “Sleepless Nights.” The second half opens with “The Price of Love” which was a bigger hit with 1965’s swinging London set as it grooved on the kind of R&B mod kids loved. Even though their mainstream popularity waned Stateside and they became a fan’s band by the end of the ‘60s, songs like “Bowling Green” and a psychedelic version of Jimmy Rodgers’ “T for Texas” have aged remarkably well, while helping pioneer country rock.

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