19 Songs, 53 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Despite all his late-in-life struggles, there was a time when Phil Spector’s control-freak excesses made for exciting pop music. He is one of very few producers who can sell a set of music on his own name and sound recognition. He lined up the best session musicians in Los Angeles for his Wall of Sound on his own Philles Records label, grabbed the best songwriters and then found the perfect singers to deliver his message alongside his “little symphonies for the kids.” This collection is a 50-year Anniversary Celebration. The songs still sound every bit as fun as the day they were released, whether it’s the Crystals working out “Da Doo Ron Ron,” the Ronettes pumping through “Be My Baby” or Ike & Tina Turner blazing through the dynamic “River Deep, Mountain High.” Between 1961 and 1966, Spector was an important part of the music industry. He gave the world the momentous Righteous Brothers recording of “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling” and kept the competition — from the Beatles to the emerging psychedelic scene in Los Angeles — constantly exploring new ways to record sound.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Despite all his late-in-life struggles, there was a time when Phil Spector’s control-freak excesses made for exciting pop music. He is one of very few producers who can sell a set of music on his own name and sound recognition. He lined up the best session musicians in Los Angeles for his Wall of Sound on his own Philles Records label, grabbed the best songwriters and then found the perfect singers to deliver his message alongside his “little symphonies for the kids.” This collection is a 50-year Anniversary Celebration. The songs still sound every bit as fun as the day they were released, whether it’s the Crystals working out “Da Doo Ron Ron,” the Ronettes pumping through “Be My Baby” or Ike & Tina Turner blazing through the dynamic “River Deep, Mountain High.” Between 1961 and 1966, Spector was an important part of the music industry. He gave the world the momentous Righteous Brothers recording of “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling” and kept the competition — from the Beatles to the emerging psychedelic scene in Los Angeles — constantly exploring new ways to record sound.

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