14 Songs, 1 Hour 2 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Kat Edmonson was born in the '80s, but her first live concert, courtesy of her mother, featured The Ink Spots. Her musical trajectory was set, and that pretty much explained her seemingly instinctual delivery of jazz classics on her 2009 debut, Take to the Sky. With what seems equal parts innate ability and some solid training, her astounding talents take a more expansive turn on Way Down Low. Many of her own tunes—like the pop-inflected treat “Lucky” and the bossa nova–inspired “What Else Can I Do?”—stand strong next to the work of The Beach Boys (she offers a spare and moving cover of “I Just Wasn’t Made for These Times”) and The Ink Spots (her “Whispering Grass” is devastating and lovely, her voice ringing with Billie Holiday–like melancholy). Edmonson does indeed carry a hint of Holiday, along with a dash of Blossom Dearie and traces of Madeleine Peyroux. Her first treatment of the Sonny Henry tune “I Don’t Know” imbues the tune with pop effervescence. Later, in a reprise, she deconstructs the song, delivering a broken and crumbled version palpitating with defeat. It’s a gorgeous moment, one of many on Way Down Low.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Kat Edmonson was born in the '80s, but her first live concert, courtesy of her mother, featured The Ink Spots. Her musical trajectory was set, and that pretty much explained her seemingly instinctual delivery of jazz classics on her 2009 debut, Take to the Sky. With what seems equal parts innate ability and some solid training, her astounding talents take a more expansive turn on Way Down Low. Many of her own tunes—like the pop-inflected treat “Lucky” and the bossa nova–inspired “What Else Can I Do?”—stand strong next to the work of The Beach Boys (she offers a spare and moving cover of “I Just Wasn’t Made for These Times”) and The Ink Spots (her “Whispering Grass” is devastating and lovely, her voice ringing with Billie Holiday–like melancholy). Edmonson does indeed carry a hint of Holiday, along with a dash of Blossom Dearie and traces of Madeleine Peyroux. Her first treatment of the Sonny Henry tune “I Don’t Know” imbues the tune with pop effervescence. Later, in a reprise, she deconstructs the song, delivering a broken and crumbled version palpitating with defeat. It’s a gorgeous moment, one of many on Way Down Low.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
35 Ratings
35 Ratings
PepoG

Way Down Low

I got the pleasure to know about Kat's talent through a PBS special when playing at Austin. Her talent and voice are jewels that like many others are waiting to become main stream; to me, she is already a star, famous on her own right!!!

KellyLoveJ

Beautiful and unique talent

I saw Kat in Austin and was blown away by her amazing vocal talent. Her phrasing is impeccable and hard to compare to anything else contemporary. Perfect lazy Sunday soundtrack (and any other day of the week). Truly a gifted artist and I haven't been so impressed since I saw Jenny Lewis years ago!

BallpointHeroine23

INCREDIBLE! Omigosh. Love it.

Kat Edmonson is so awesome. I can't even explain how incredibly talented she is and what a blooming songwriter! She is on every playlist I have and whenever one of her songs comes on I have no choice but to sing along. BUY THIS ALBUM! Buy EVERY album of hers. You won't be dissapointed.

About Kat Edmonson

Possessing a fleet, light voice and a sly touch, jazz vocalist Kat Edmonson brings both the songs and the sensibility of the Great American Songbook into the 21st century. Her debut 2009 debut album, Take to the Sky, split the difference between Cole Porter and the Cure, and as she continued to record over the course of the 2010s, she started to incorporate original material on her new albums.

A native of Houston, Texas, Edmonson began to write songs as a child, and after attending South Carolina's College of Charleston for a time, she relocated to Austin, Texas to pursue a musical career. After an unsuccessful audition for the second season of American Idol, she hunkered down in Austin and developed her idiosyncratic vocal style.

In 2009 she independently released her debut, Take to the Sky, which wound up climbing into the Top 20 of the Billboard jazz charts. Three years later she independently released Way Down Low, which made it to number one on Billboard's Heatseekers chart in the wake of positive notices on NPR and in The New York Times. After Way Down Low, Edmonson signed to Sony Masterworks, which released The Big Picture in 2014; the album was produced by Mitchell Froom. An appearance as a singer in Woody Allen's 2016 film Café Society appeared before she started work on her fourth album. Produced by Edmonson, the resulting Old Fashioned Gal was a collection of all originals and appeared in the spring of 2018.

HOMETOWN
Houston, TX
GENRE
Jazz
BORN
August 3, 1983

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