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We Don't Have Each Other

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Album Review

Philadelphia-based singer/songwriter and Wonder Years frontman Dan "Soupy" Campbell tries his hand at Americana storytelling with the debut of his new solo project Aaron West and the Roaring Twenties. After four albums and countless tours with his hardworking pop punk band, stripping down for a more organic, acoustic approach seems like a natural move for a maturing artist in a genre known its youthful angst and snarkiness. He's certainly not the first to trade in his Vans for some well-worn hobo boots, but while the instrumentation has changed from power chords to banjos and harmonica, Campbell's new subdued approach still takes a decidedly emo bent as he delivers a sort of concept album which paints the portrait of the character Aaron West, a sad Brooklynite in a dead-end relationship trying to bust out. Produced by the Early November's Ace Enders, We Don't Have Each Other is broad in its scope as Campbell tries to fully inhabit West's life and subsequent escape, delivering the lyrics in third person with a sensitive, toned-down croon that that still rings with punk affectation. The story itself is compelling as it unfolds over a backdrop of gently strummed roots folk with big, emo choruses.

Customer Reviews

SO STOKED

Every single song Soupy has put out has been pure gold - whether it was a Wonder Years song, solo, or he was featured in a song by another band. This album is going to be INCREDIBLE.

Most emotional songs from Soupy to date.

If you know anything about Dan "Soupy" Campbell, then you know he is an English major, a poet, and a lyricist. What he has done is created a character, Aaron West, and created an entire story about him. He has figured out the way West feels, the way he thinks, and he feels the struggles that West is going through.

Soupy is noted for fronting The Wonder Years. That band, in itself, is single-handedly one of the only bands that can bring me to tears. Aaron West and the Roaring Twenties has now taken that place, just from two songs. With everything I'm going through right now, I can't see this album being a bust for my personal collection. I relate to the character that Soupy has created. I know how it feels to be in a constant war with yourself. I know how it feels to want to make things right, when everything has just gone wrong. There is nothing about the two singles released from this album that doesn't wrech my heart out of place.

Support this album however you can. Buy it, spread the word, and let it help you.

Sad but great

He really knows how to get into your heart. First time I heard this I loved the rhythm but then I actually listed to the lyrics and felt his pain so all In all this album is great

Biography

Born: 2014 in Philadelphia, PA

Genre: Alternative

Years Active: '10s

Aaron West & the Roaring Twenties is the first solo project from singer/songwriter Dan Campbell, who is best known as the frontman for pop-punk act the Wonder Years. Looking to improve his guitar chops and expand his lyrical style, Campbell began writing songs on acoustic guitar that blended the passion and aggression of pop punk with more of an Americana and roots aesthetic. The new music didn't fit the Wonder Years' style and, while never intended for release, Campbell had casually played a...
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We Don't Have Each Other, Aaron West and The Roaring Twenties
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