11 Songs, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

There’s a sense of freedom and adventure to Nicole Atkins' third album, Slow Phaser. The blues and country reference points that were so evident in the singer/songwriter’s initial work are skillfully blended in with fresh techno and prog-rock textures to create a striking hybrid at once edgy and elegant. Atkins’ vocals have the richness and kick of aged burgundy, veering from erotic insinuations to stinging kiss-offs (sometimes in the same song). Molten basslines and tremolo guitar dabs give “Who Killed the Moonlight?” and “Girl You Look Amazing” a seductive slink that underscores their conspiratorial tone. Skirting the border between temptation and torment, Atkins connects with her inner soul diva on “The Worst Hangover” and flashes a steely disdain worthy of Chrissie Hynde on “What Do You Know?” Tracks like the sarcastic yet bubbly “Cool People,” the jittery “We Wait Too Long,” and the spiritually twisted “Sin Song” unsettle even as they satisfy. Atkins leaves the listener in the throes of moody rapture on “Above as Below,” bringing this artistically bold and emotionally striking collection to an evocative close.

EDITORS’ NOTES

There’s a sense of freedom and adventure to Nicole Atkins' third album, Slow Phaser. The blues and country reference points that were so evident in the singer/songwriter’s initial work are skillfully blended in with fresh techno and prog-rock textures to create a striking hybrid at once edgy and elegant. Atkins’ vocals have the richness and kick of aged burgundy, veering from erotic insinuations to stinging kiss-offs (sometimes in the same song). Molten basslines and tremolo guitar dabs give “Who Killed the Moonlight?” and “Girl You Look Amazing” a seductive slink that underscores their conspiratorial tone. Skirting the border between temptation and torment, Atkins connects with her inner soul diva on “The Worst Hangover” and flashes a steely disdain worthy of Chrissie Hynde on “What Do You Know?” Tracks like the sarcastic yet bubbly “Cool People,” the jittery “We Wait Too Long,” and the spiritually twisted “Sin Song” unsettle even as they satisfy. Atkins leaves the listener in the throes of moody rapture on “Above as Below,” bringing this artistically bold and emotionally striking collection to an evocative close.

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