"Weird Scenes Inside the Gold Mine" by The Doors on iTunes

22 Songs

EDITORS’ NOTES

This double LP was the first compilation of The Doors’ music released after singer Jim Morrison’s 1971 death. It avoided duplicating the hits that appeared on their 1970 greatest-hits collection, 13, and included high-profile tracks and deep cuts from the group’s first six studio albums. In addition, two obscure b-sides—“Who Scared You” (the March 1969 flipside to “Wishful Sinful”) and a cover of Willie Dixon’s “(You Need Meat) Don’t Go No Further” (the 1971 flipside of “Love Her Madly”)—were included, filling out the official tracks recorded and released with Jim Morrison. It should be noted that this modern reissue was overseen by the band’s longtime engineer, Bruce Botnick, and the remixed versions of “Break On Through” and “The End” appear in place of the original mixes from 1967. Without most of the obvious hits, Weird Scenes reveals The Doors' darker, more experimental side, while songs like “Strange Days,” “The WASP (Texas Radio and the Big Beat),” “The Spy,” and “When the Music’s Over” show the band’s FM-radio side.

Explicit

EDITORS’ NOTES

This double LP was the first compilation of The Doors’ music released after singer Jim Morrison’s 1971 death. It avoided duplicating the hits that appeared on their 1970 greatest-hits collection, 13, and included high-profile tracks and deep cuts from the group’s first six studio albums. In addition, two obscure b-sides—“Who Scared You” (the March 1969 flipside to “Wishful Sinful”) and a cover of Willie Dixon’s “(You Need Meat) Don’t Go No Further” (the 1971 flipside of “Love Her Madly”)—were included, filling out the official tracks recorded and released with Jim Morrison. It should be noted that this modern reissue was overseen by the band’s longtime engineer, Bruce Botnick, and the remixed versions of “Break On Through” and “The End” appear in place of the original mixes from 1967. Without most of the obvious hits, Weird Scenes reveals The Doors' darker, more experimental side, while songs like “Strange Days,” “The WASP (Texas Radio and the Big Beat),” “The Spy,” and “When the Music’s Over” show the band’s FM-radio side.

Explicit
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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5

22 Ratings

the First Doors LP I Ever Heard...

Dave from Fernley,

...was this one. As a Greatest Hits collection, it blows. There is though a real sense of danger and paranoia that threads through the entire set. I'd recommend it. Glad it's here.

Finally digital...

johnestock,

I had the vinyl and the cassette of this. First Doors album I ever heard, and believe you me I was transported. Incredible.

About The Doors

The Doors, one of the most influential and controversial rock bands of the 1960s, were formed in Los Angeles in 1965 by UCLA film students Ray Manzarek, keyboards, and Jim Morrison, vocals; with drummer John Densmore and guitarist Robby Krieger. The group never added a bass player, and their sound was dominated by Manzarek's electric organ work and Morrison's deep, sonorous voice, with which he sang and intoned his highly poetic lyrics. The group signed to Elektra Records in 1966 and released its first album, The Doors, featuring the hit "Light My Fire," in 1967.

Like "Light My Fire," the debut album was a massive hit, and endures as one of the most exciting, groundbreaking recordings of the psychedelic era. Blending blues, classical, Eastern music, and pop into sinister but beguiling melodies, the band sounded like no other. With his rich, chilling vocals and somber poetic visions, Morrison explored the depths of the darkest and most thrilling aspects of the psychedelic experience. Their first effort was so stellar, in fact, that the Doors were hard-pressed to match it, and although their next few albums contained a wealth of first-rate material, the group also began running up against the limitations of their recklessly disturbing visions. By their third album, they had exhausted their initial reservoir of compositions, and some of the tracks they hurriedly devised to meet public demand were clearly inferior to, and imitative of, their best early work.

On The Soft Parade, the group experimented with brass sections, with mixed results. Accused (without much merit) by much of the rock underground as pop sellouts, the group charged back hard with the final two albums they recorded with Morrison, on which they drew upon stone-cold blues for much of their inspiration, especially on 1971's L.A. Woman.

From the start, the Doors' focus was the charismatic Morrison, who proved increasingly unstable over the group's brief career. In 1969, Morrison was arrested for indecent exposure during a concert in Miami, an incident that nearly derailed the band. Nevertheless, the Doors managed to turn out a series of successful albums and singles through 1971, when, upon the completion of L.A. Woman, Morrison decamped for Paris. He died there, apparently of a drug overdose. The three surviving Doors tried to carry on without him, but ultimately disbanded. Yet the Doors' music and Morrison's legend continued to fascinate succeeding generations of rock fans: in the mid-'80s, Morrison was as big a star as he'd been in the mid-'60s, and Elektra has sold numerous quantities of the Doors' original albums plus reissues and releases of live material over the years, while publishers have flooded bookstores with Doors and Morrison biographies. In 1991, director Oliver Stone made The Doors, a feature film about the group starring Val Kilmer as Morrison.

The remaining three members of the Doors -- Manzarek, Densmore, and Krieger -- were involved in various musical activities in the decades following Morrison's death but never saw successes approaching the levels of the original Doors. After the turn of the millennium, Manzarek and Krieger performed live under the name Doors of the 21st Century with singer Ian Astbury of the Cult handling vocals; a legal battle ensued when Densmore filed suit against his former bandmates over use of the Doors name. Ray Manzarek died in May 2013 in Rosenheim, Germany after battling bile duct cancer; he was 74 years old. On February 12, 2016, Krieger and Densmore reunited as a tribute to Manzarek at the benefit concert Stand Up to Cancer. Later that year, the earliest known live tapes of the Doors were released as London Fog 1966, and early in 2017 the Doors celebrated their 50th anniversary with deluxe reissues of their debut album and Strange Days, along with a new compilation called Singles. ~ William Ruhlmann & Richie Unterberger

  • ORIGIN
    Los Angeles, CA
  • FORMED
    Jul 1965

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