Live At the Burton Cummings Theatre by The Weakerthans on Apple Music

19 Songs

EDITORS’ NOTES

The indie-rock masters from Canada (Winnipeg and Toronto) deliver a live album that extends from every angle of their decade-long career. The pure punk-pop punch of the six-minute “Wellington’s Wednesdays” from their 1999 debut album Fallow falls into line with the stylistically diverse material from their three ensuing studio albums. Audience noise is kept to a minimum and stage patter is jettisoned for a tight, concise set of one melodic gem another. “Reconstruction Site,” the title track from their third album, and “Benediction” add pedal steel and a country lope. “Civil Twilight,” from the band’s 2007 release Reunion Tour, adds a bouncy keyboard to its skittering groove and solid harmonies. But nothing beats the simple, straightforward drive of “”Plea from a Cat Named Virtue,” where the band take to the road like a van-battered Midwest American rock ‘n’ roll band (or maybe these Canadians just wait for summer’s big thaw and trek the Provinces). In any case, with singer John K. Samson leading the way, the Weakerthans are among the finest bands of the 2000s.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The indie-rock masters from Canada (Winnipeg and Toronto) deliver a live album that extends from every angle of their decade-long career. The pure punk-pop punch of the six-minute “Wellington’s Wednesdays” from their 1999 debut album Fallow falls into line with the stylistically diverse material from their three ensuing studio albums. Audience noise is kept to a minimum and stage patter is jettisoned for a tight, concise set of one melodic gem another. “Reconstruction Site,” the title track from their third album, and “Benediction” add pedal steel and a country lope. “Civil Twilight,” from the band’s 2007 release Reunion Tour, adds a bouncy keyboard to its skittering groove and solid harmonies. But nothing beats the simple, straightforward drive of “”Plea from a Cat Named Virtue,” where the band take to the road like a van-battered Midwest American rock ‘n’ roll band (or maybe these Canadians just wait for summer’s big thaw and trek the Provinces). In any case, with singer John K. Samson leading the way, the Weakerthans are among the finest bands of the 2000s.

TITLE TIME
4:01
3:26
2:31
4:45
2:49
3:20
2:55
2:53
5:04
2:40
3:54
5:03
6:05
3:32
1:56
3:34
4:52
4:16
19 3:26

About The Weakerthans

Formed after Propagandhi member John K. Samson got the itch to perform and record again after taking a sabbatical to write and start a publishing company, the Winnipeg-based Weakerthans took Samson's music in a completely different direction. Propagandhi had been known for powerful, speedy punk and overtly political lyrics, but the Weakerthans went down a more melodic and introspective path. Consisting of Red Fisher drummer Jason Tait and bassist John Sutton, the Weakerthans took their name from a line from the film adaptation of Marguerite Duras' The Lover: "Go ahead, I'm weaker than you can possibly imagine." The band prided itself on its high standards, both as political beings (shying away from large label or distribution contracts because of their connection to exploitation) and in their personal lives (promoting vegetarianism) and received critical praise for their debut album, Fallow, which was issued in 1998 on a co-operative label, G7& Welcoming Records. With the added presence of guitarist Steve Carroll, the group's second full-length, Left and Leaving, was issued in early 2000 and the Watermark EP followed a year later. By 2003, the band found a deal with Epitaph and issued Reconstruction Site, their breakthrough album. Soon after, however, Sutton left the Weakerthans, only to be replaced with bassist/keyboardist Greg Smith, and in 2007 the band released the fourth album in their ten-year tenure, Reunion Tour. ~ Stacia Proefrock

  • ORIGIN
    Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
  • FORMED
    1997

Top Songs

Top Albums

Top Music Videos

Listeners Also Played