12 Songs, 44 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Nashville fads swing back and forth between pop and twang, but for the last fifteen years, chart-topper Alan Jackson has sat smack dab in the middle with a big, friendly smile on his face, racking up one hit after another. On his fourteenth album, the laid-back Georgia native offers his usual mix of heartfelt love songs, toe-tapping honky tonk, and unapologetically dopey novelty tunes. It kicks off with "Too Much of a Good Thing," an irresistible hit single with the feel of a timeless country classic, and continues along the same vein with Jackson's oaken vocals gliding atop a sweet mix of fiddles, guitars, and pedal steel. The mournful "Monday Morning Church" features harmony vocals from Jackson's fellow neo-traditionalist Patty Loveless, while "The Talkin' Song Repair Blues" was a goofy and therefore unexpected radio hit. Jackson also introduces his fans to country newcomers the Wrights, a husband-wife duo who wrote two of the songs here, adding their considerable talents to the already-swinging Alan Jackson sound. This is commercial country music at its very best.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Nashville fads swing back and forth between pop and twang, but for the last fifteen years, chart-topper Alan Jackson has sat smack dab in the middle with a big, friendly smile on his face, racking up one hit after another. On his fourteenth album, the laid-back Georgia native offers his usual mix of heartfelt love songs, toe-tapping honky tonk, and unapologetically dopey novelty tunes. It kicks off with "Too Much of a Good Thing," an irresistible hit single with the feel of a timeless country classic, and continues along the same vein with Jackson's oaken vocals gliding atop a sweet mix of fiddles, guitars, and pedal steel. The mournful "Monday Morning Church" features harmony vocals from Jackson's fellow neo-traditionalist Patty Loveless, while "The Talkin' Song Repair Blues" was a goofy and therefore unexpected radio hit. Jackson also introduces his fans to country newcomers the Wrights, a husband-wife duo who wrote two of the songs here, adding their considerable talents to the already-swinging Alan Jackson sound. This is commercial country music at its very best.

TITLE TIME

More By Alan Jackson

You May Also Like