11 Songs, 27 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Cute (one man) band alert! Yes, Never Shout Never is actually Christofer Ingle from Jopin, MO. He sings acoustic emo-pop with a boyish voice that endearingly over annunciates clever lyrics of introspection and romantic narratives about the burning urgency of adolescent adoration. After becoming an overnight MySpace sensation, Ingle quit high school to record and tour full-time. His performance on MTV’s TRL thrust him into the mania of screaming underage fans and sprinting from backstage exits to tour-bus doors. The analogue crackles and hiss of a needle stylus dropping on a dusty vinyl record sets an intimate tone before “Love Is Our Weapon” opens Ingle’s debut album What Is Love? with charming aplomb and an adorably idealistic message about how love can defeat all that is evil and unjust. “Jane Doe” is a precious little ditty that waxes fairytale romance with warm accordion drones while the more bouncy “Can’t Stand It” muses on what it feels like to crush out on someone more than you can take. Bonus track “Fifteen” recalls Kings Of Convenience recalling Simon & Garfunkel while “Damn Dog” gets more Nick Drakey with a string section and melancholic minor chords.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Cute (one man) band alert! Yes, Never Shout Never is actually Christofer Ingle from Jopin, MO. He sings acoustic emo-pop with a boyish voice that endearingly over annunciates clever lyrics of introspection and romantic narratives about the burning urgency of adolescent adoration. After becoming an overnight MySpace sensation, Ingle quit high school to record and tour full-time. His performance on MTV’s TRL thrust him into the mania of screaming underage fans and sprinting from backstage exits to tour-bus doors. The analogue crackles and hiss of a needle stylus dropping on a dusty vinyl record sets an intimate tone before “Love Is Our Weapon” opens Ingle’s debut album What Is Love? with charming aplomb and an adorably idealistic message about how love can defeat all that is evil and unjust. “Jane Doe” is a precious little ditty that waxes fairytale romance with warm accordion drones while the more bouncy “Can’t Stand It” muses on what it feels like to crush out on someone more than you can take. Bonus track “Fifteen” recalls Kings Of Convenience recalling Simon & Garfunkel while “Damn Dog” gets more Nick Drakey with a string section and melancholic minor chords.

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