18 Songs, 1 Hour 14 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

One could argue that nearly every song Tina Turner sang was a "love song" to some degree. But this album—intended as a perfect Valentine’s Day gift for pop and soul music fans everywhere—brings out many of the biggest love songs in the catalog of this Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee. An eight-time GRAMMY Award winner, Turner charted more than 15 solo hit singles on the Billboard Hot 100 charts; she started her streak on Jan. 21, 1984, with a version of Al Green’s “Let’s Stay Together” and continued with such fan favorites as “What’s Love Got to Do with It” and “Private Dancer," plus later hits like “The Best” and a take on John Waite’s “Missing You.” Previously, as half of Ike & Tina Turner, she scored 20 hits from 1960 through 1975, including the Phil Spector–produced “River Deep Mountain High”; that track sends off this fine collection.

EDITORS’ NOTES

One could argue that nearly every song Tina Turner sang was a "love song" to some degree. But this album—intended as a perfect Valentine’s Day gift for pop and soul music fans everywhere—brings out many of the biggest love songs in the catalog of this Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee. An eight-time GRAMMY Award winner, Turner charted more than 15 solo hit singles on the Billboard Hot 100 charts; she started her streak on Jan. 21, 1984, with a version of Al Green’s “Let’s Stay Together” and continued with such fan favorites as “What’s Love Got to Do with It” and “Private Dancer," plus later hits like “The Best” and a take on John Waite’s “Missing You.” Previously, as half of Ike & Tina Turner, she scored 20 hits from 1960 through 1975, including the Phil Spector–produced “River Deep Mountain High”; that track sends off this fine collection.

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About Tina Turner

Pouring pain and experience and raw sensuality into performances that mix rock, soul, and blues, singer-songwriter Tina Turner is a wellspring of uncontainable energy. Born Anna Mae Bullock in Nutbush, Tennessee, in 1939, Turner sang in church choirs before featuring in The Kings of Rhythm, an R&B* *band led by her future husband Ike Turner—from whom she would suffer more than a decade of abuse. She channeled that emotion to turn Creedence Clearwater Revival’s gently rolling “Proud Mary” into a tear-the-roof-off anthem and imbue 1973’s semi-autobiographical “Nutbush City Limits” with a self-aware wit. Her show-stealing turn as The Acid Queen in 1975’s film version of The Who’s Tommy only further highlighted her range and hinted at the chart-topping force she’d become. After divorcing Ike and reclaiming her independence in the late ’70s, Turner became a watchword for liberation and self-empowerment at a time when there wasn’t much vocabulary for it. She reinvented herself as a wounded-but-wise R&B singer, chronicling the often devastating complexities of romance with the intimacy and strength of a survivor—particularly on her 1984 pop breakthrough, Private Dancer. In anyone else’s hands, songs such as “Better Be Good to Me” and "What’s Love Got to Do With It” are breezy FM-radio tunes; in Turner's, they're real-life examinations of how destructive emotions can be—a perspective you can still hear in the toughness and vulnerability of Beyoncé and Mary J. Blige. That grace and confidence carried on through the ensuing decades of her work, whether as the singer of 1989's triumphant “The Best,” the actor in Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome, the author of the frank memoir I, Tina, a style icon, a hero to victims of domestic abuse, or an adherent of Buddhism, whose teachings have fueled her creatively and spiritually since the ’70s. Speaking to Oprah Winfrey in 2005, she said, “I want my gift to become a gift for others. We're caught in a stagnant belief system passed on to us from our parents and what’s been given from the churches. I believe there’s another truth. Dancing and singing is all good—but the ultimate gift is to change people’s minds.”

HOMETOWN
Brownsville, TN
BORN
November 26, 1939

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